Egypt Marks One-Year Anniversary of Uprising

Egypt Marks One-Year Anniversary of Uprising

With mixed emotion, Egyptians gathered in Cairo’s Tahrir Square today to commemorate the one-year anniversary of the overthrow of former President Hosni Mubarak.

Published January 25, 2012

With mixed emotion, Egyptians gathered in Cairo’s Tahrir Square Wednesday to commemorate the one-year anniversary of the overthrow of former President Hosni Mubarak.


Although many are proud of the country’s accomplishment at successfully toppling Mubarak, Egyptians understand that the there is still much work to be done and the focus of discontent has now turned to the interim military government, which many feel has overstayed its welcome.


"I'm here for the first anniversary of the revolution. Let's not say to 'celebrate' it," Egyptian Nada Ramadan told the BBC. "I realize many rights have not yet been given to people. This is not over."


On Jan. 25, 2011, Egyptians unhappy with the government staged the “Day of Revolt” complete with countrywide protests, labor strikes and acts of civil disobedience. The demonstrations continued for days as protesters clashed with authorities and drew international attention to their plight through social media.


Since then, the Egyptian military has stepped in to help rule the country in the interim and has drawn heat from critics who say they are becoming as repressive as the leader the country just deposed.


Many female protesters and activists have accused the military forces of abuse and the issue drew international attention after graphic YouTube videos and photos surfaced documenting their struggle.


U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke out on the issue stating, "This systematic degradation of Egyptian women dishonors the revolution, disgraces the state and its uniform, and is not worthy of a great people.”


However, now that the country has finished up its last round of parliamentary elections, Egypt’s first freely elected parliament in decades will soon draft a new constitution and have the chance to breathe new life into the country’s government.


The Islamist Muslim Brotherhood, long suppressed under Mubarak, has emerged as the victor of the parliamentary elections, winning a majority of the seats. The challenge now will be whether or not the people’s new government can live up to the ideals that they fought so hard for.


"The priorities are meeting the demands of the revolution, including the rights of the injured and those killed in the uprising," newly elected speaker of the assembly Saad al-Katatni told Reuters.  


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(Photo:  Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Written by Naeesa Aziz

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