Group in U.K. Wants to Ban Hair Weaves

Group in U.K. Wants to Ban Hair Weaves

The Trichology Society is on a mission to ban hair extensions because of the damage they say it does to women's hair.

Published June 3, 2011

Weave wearers in the United Kingdom beware. The Trichology Society is on a mission to ban hair extensions because of the damage they say it does to women’s hair.

 

The Trichology Society reports a 15 percent jump in the last two years of women seeking help for their damaged tresses, and attributes this to the glue in extensions. The group claims that in the past they were seeing only 30 women a month but now that number has increased to 50 and is still growing.

 

The Trichology Society wants to get rid of the bonding glue because of their belief that it causes traction alopecia, ripping women’s hair out at the root and causing tiny bald spots. Even after women stop wearing the glued-in extensions the damage could be irreparable.

 

Hairstylist Jhavuanna Moody of Evolution the Green Room Salon, an eco-friendly salon in Brooklyn, New York, has no qualms about the ban. “I don’t like them either. They completely rip out your hair and it takes a lot to get it out.”

 

Moody believes weaves can be a positive thing for women’s hair if they’re done and cared for properly. Most of her clients opt for either sewn-in weaves or hair clips, depending on the texture of their hair.

 

Here are a few tips from Jhavuanna on how to avoid hair damage while enjoying a little extra length:

 

—When getting sewn-in weaves always make sure your stylist sews the extensions on to the net, not your hair. This is where the breakage usually happens.

 

—Only keep your weave for 2 1/2 to 3 months at a time, going into the salon for a wash and moisture treatment every two weeks.

 

—Always wear a silk scarf to bed. If it slips off at night invest in a few silk pillows as well.

 

—Between weaves, it’s nice to let your hair breathe for a week, but it’s not necessary. You should, however, trim your natural hair and have a protein treatment before getting a new weave.

 

(Photo: Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)

Written by Brandi Tape

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