Fed Decision Drowns a Mostly Black Town

Fed Decision Drowns a Mostly Black Town

The roughly 30 residents of the predominantly-black community fled their homes to escape the Mississippi River.

Published June 21, 2011

In May, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers blew several large holes in a levee on the Mississippi River, in eastern Missouri.

 

Prior to those acts the roughly 30 residents of the predominantly-black community of Pinhook, Missouri, where more than 250 people had lived during the 1960s left their homes for higher ground, and for good.

 

Pinhook’s Mayor Debra Tarver says that the residents would like to be resettled together. They also contend that since the government forced them out that the Feds should relocate them too.

 

A local politician, state Rep. Steve Hodges, doesn't think that’s possible. He says “It is probably the government's responsibility to some extent. But that? I don't see it."

 

The Army Corps deatroyed part of the levee to protect towns further up river from the Mississippi’s cresting waters.

 

In response to the dislocation, George Williams, who lived in Pinhook for more than 60 years told the Associated Press that the town is “never going to recover. It won't. It's over with."

(Photo: Times-Picayune /Landov)

Written by Frank McCoy

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