Convicted D.C. Sniper Lee Boyd Malvo Expresses Remorse: "I Was a Monster"

The shooter tells families of victims to forget about him and move forward on on eve of 10th anniversary of the shooting spree.

Posted: 10/01/2012 04:17 PM EDT

Although the chances of those affected by the Washington, D.C., sniper shootings ever truly putting that terror behind them are slim, that's exactly what convicted shooter Lee Boyd Malvo has asked them to do. In an interview with the Washington Post in time for Tuesday's 10th anniversary of the deadly shooting spree, Malvo expressed remorse and asked that the victims' families try to move on with their lives.

 

"We can never change what happened," Malvo said. "There's nothing that I can say except don't allow me and my actions to continue to victimize you for the rest of your life. ... Don't allow myself or [crime partner John Allen] Muhammad to continue to make you a victim for the rest of your life. It isn't worth it."

 

For 21 days in October 2002, Malvo and Muhammad terrorized the Washington, D.C., area. They killed 10 strangers and were linked to 27 other shootings across the country. Muhammad was executed in Virginia in 2009. Malvo, then an impressionable teenager, is now 27. He is serving a life sentence in prison for murder.

 

He also recalled seeing one woman's husband's face right after she was shot and feeling like "the worst piece of scum." The victim, 47-year-old FBI analyst Linda Franklin, was killed outside a Home Depot in Virginia.

 

"They are penetrating," Malvo said of Ted Franklin's eyes. "It is the worst sort of pain I have ever seen in my life. His eyes ... Words do not possess the depth in which to fully convey that emotion and what I felt when I saw it. ... You feel like the worst piece of scum on the planet."

 

BET National News - Keep up to date with breaking news stories from around the nation, including headlines from the hip hop and entertainment world. Click here to subscribe to our newsletter.

Videos You May Like

From Our Partners