Supreme Court Rules Against "Proof-of-Citizenship" Voter ID Law

Justices decide the law makes it harder for citizens to vote.

Posted: 06/17/2013 10:56 AM EDT

In a 7-2 vote Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court voted against a provision in Arizona's voter registration law, which required voters to provide proof of citizenship.

In the case of Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, Inc., the court ruled that Arizona's law conflicts with the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 that requires states to "accept and use" a specific federal form for voter registration.  

The court added that a federal form is "sufficient proof" of evidence of citizenship for voters and additional proof would make it harder for citizens to vote.

"The NVRA effectively required the states to treat the federal form as sufficient evidence of citizenship without any additional proof, so that Arizona’s proof-of-citizenship requirement was contrary to the NVRA, and therefore invalid," according to SCOTUSblog.com

Arizona is allowed to challenge the Election Assistance Commission, which creates the federal form, to include a requirement for additional proof of citizenship on forms. The state has argued that the added provision prevents voter fraud. 

On Monday, the Supreme Court also announced that they will take on a case involving the Fair Housing Act in the fall. The justices will decide whether the act is enough for people to prove they were victims of intentional housing discrimination. 

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 (Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

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