BP Oil Spill: One Year Later

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Effect on the Environment


When oil enters the ecosystem, it takes a while to leave while making everything it touches unsuitable for wildlife. In this June 2010 photo, a man reaches into thick oil on the surface of the northern regions of Barataria Bay in Plaquemines Parish, La.

In this two picture combo, nesting pelicans are seen landing as oil washes ashore on May 22, 2010, left, on Cat Island, home to hundreds of brown pelican nests as well at terns, gulls and roseate spoonbills in Barataria Bay, just inside the the coast of Lousiana. The second photo, taken in the same spot on April 8, 2011, shows the shoreline heavily eroded, and the lush marsh grass and mangrove trees mostly dead or dying.

(Photo: AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

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