Weiner's Back Is Against the Political Wall, and No One Will Aid Him

Weiner's Back Is Against the Political Wall, and No One Will Aid Him

Rep. Anthony D. Weiner's political, and personal, life continues to unravel in public, as fellow Democrats create distance between him and themselves.

Published June 8, 2011

The string of Rep. Anthony D. Weiner ‘s political, and personal, life continues to unravel in public, as fellow Democrats create distance between him and themselves. The Washington Post reported that the top Democrat, Nevada Sen. Harry S. Reid, speaking about the New York Congressman caught in a tawdry Internet sex scandal with at least six women, said he'd tell Weiner to call someone else if he asked him for advice, and that "I wish there was some way I can defend him, but I can’t.”

 

The continuing revelations about Weiner’s illicit sexual actions has unsettled Democrats on Capitol Hill, while he has remained consistent, thus far, in refusing to resign. But resistance to Weiner’s staying in Congress is growing.

 

Top Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi has called for a House ethics investigation into Weiner’s actions. Next week fellow Democrats return from recess and many may feel betrayed after listening and watching the New York Representative lie repeatedly that his Twitter account was hacked, and Republican foes are ramping up their calls for Weiner’s resignation.

 

The criticism of Weiner’s actions has become intense. According to the New York Times, New York Democratic Rep. Nydia M. Velázquez said that she asked him, “How can you explain that somebody can be so smart but so stupid?”

 

In a telling statement reported by the Washington Post that may be a harbinger, another New York Rep. Steve Israel, the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, in a press release, said, “Ultimately, Anthony and his constituents will make a judgment about his future.”

 

Weiner supposedly had interest in becoming New York City’s mayor. He ran and lost in a bid for the seat in 2005. Now with comedians, and everyday citizens in Gotham and across the country, commenting on his salacious interactions with at least six women, Weiner’s next position may remain the one he has now: laughingstock.

(Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Written by Frank McCoy

COMMENTS

Latest in news