2011 BET Awards

The 2011 BET Awards returned to the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles with a hilarious new host, new winners, a new category, big performances and a huge night for Chris Brown. No one can forget host Kevin Hart’s tribute to Black fraternities when he opened the show with pint-sized steppers Kevin Phi Kevin, who danced to Lil Wayne’s “6 Foot, 7 Foot.”

When it came to hitting the stage, Mary J. Blige took fans on a ride down memory lane with a throwback performance of “Real Love,” “Be Happy” and “Mary Jane (All Night Long).” The Queen of Hip Hop Soul then surprised everyone when Anita Baker rocked out to “Caught Up in the Rapture.” Alexander O'Neal and Cherrelle continued the old school vibe with "Saturday Love."

Patti LaBelle, who was also recognized with a Lifetime Achievement Award, raised the roof with "Lady Marmalade," while Queen Latifah reminded everyone "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised" during her tribute to the Godfather of Spoken Word, Gil Scott-Heron. Steve Harvey was given the Humanitarian Award for his tireless efforts to improve the lives of the next generation with the Steve Harvey foundation. 


The night’s stage also saw gospel greats Donnie McClurkin, Deitrick Haddon and Mary Mary give praise, Snoop Dogg and Warren G honor their homie Nate Dogg and Kelly Rowland help raise Trey Songz’s “Motivation” levels during her super sexy and much-talked about performance. However, the name on most presenters’ lips was Chris Brown, as he lead the nominations with six and rattled the stage with Busta Rhymes through his dance tracks "She Ain't You" and "Look at Me Now.”

With everyone watching, Chris Breezy took home four awards, including Best Male R&B and Video of the Year. Hollywood’s most adorable siblings, Willow and Jaden Smith, won the Young Stars Award, whereas Nicki Minaj surprised no one when she was dubbed the Best Female Hip Hop Artist for a second time. While British hottie Idris Elba and Taraji P. Henson snagged the Best Actor awards, the film For Colored Girls, Tyler Perry's adaptation of Ntozake Shange's play For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf, had no competition for the Best Movie category. The BET Awards held nothing back with another stargazing night filled with some of the industry’s most talented artists.

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