Future Has Some Controversial Thoughts About Jay Z's First Album

(Photos from left: Prince Williams/Getty Images for PUMA, Brian Ach/Getty Images)

Future Has Some Controversial Thoughts About Jay Z's First Album

And it had a lot to do with Biggie and Tupac’s deaths.

Published December 15, 2016

Atlanta’s auto-tuning rap star Future has been one of the many faces of ATL’s trap music scene for quite awhile now.

And after sharing his recent thoughts on Jay Z’s industry debut album, Reasonable Doubt, he might be another face of historical rap controversy as well.


Longtime industry professional and CEO of Translation Steve Stoute went on a brief Instagram video binge on Wednesday (Dec. 14) and posted a bundle of rapper-studded posts to his profile.

In the videos, we see Stoute’s random barbershop affairs with the likes of industry folks such as Ebro Darden, James Harden, LeBron James and Future. But one of the snippets includes an interesting conversation involving the “Purple Rain” rapper and his take on Biggie and Tupac’s deaths.

Discussing the top five rap greats of all time, Fewtch expresses that eras are significant when considering a rapper’s prime.

“Jay Z wasn’t great when Tupac and Biggie was alive,” he says. “It was Biggie, Tupac, Ice Cube.” After the other men loudly chime in, Stoute halts any more of Future’s sentiments with, “Hold up, stop. You heard the Reasonable Doubt album?”

Reasonable Doubt, as we know it, was Jay Z’s official entry into the rap game in 1996 and was considered one of hip-hop’s most classic, landmark albums. However, Future still acknowledges the debut project’s relevancy only as it related to the deaths of legendary rap household names Tupac and Biggie.

“It wasn’t hot until [Tupac and Biggie] died,” he replied. “Nobody really was checking for it.”

He commends the album for its actual rap quality, but still holds that “at the time,” its importance was heavily dependent on the fate of Pac and Biggie.

“It’s like your classic album,” he explained. “They always go back for your classic album.” He further comments that even Nas’s Illmatic was great for its time. “You had to go back and listen to Reasonable Doubt. That’s his best sh** ever.”

Jay Z seemed to somewhat agree with Future, based on his own line from his 1998 hit "Hard Knock Life." "Gave you prophecy on my first joint, y'all all lamed out/ Didn't really appreciate it, 'til the second one came out."

Check out Future’s sentiments on Jay Z’s time-honored debut undertaking below.

A video posted by stevestoute (@stevestoute) on

Written by Diamond Alexis

(Photos from left: Prince Williams/Getty Images for PUMA, Brian Ach/Getty Images)

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