Jazz Icon Al Jarreau Dies at 76

BERLIN, GERMANY - NOVEMBER 15: American singer Al Jarreau performs live during a concert at the Philharmonie on November 15, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Frank Hoensch/Redferns)

Jazz Icon Al Jarreau Dies at 76

The seven-time Grammy winner passed away Sunday morning.

Published February 12, 2017

Legendary jazz singer and performer Al Jarreau passed away Sunday morning in Los Angeles after being hospitalized for exhaustion just days ago. He was 76.

The Grammy winner announced that he was retiring from touring just days ago.

The singer's manager, Joe Gordon, confirmed the singer's death in a statement: "Al Jarreau passed away this morning, at about 5:30am LA time. He was in the hospital, kept comfortable by [his son] Ryan, [his wife] Susan, and a few of his family and friends."

The statement continued, "Ryan asks that no flowers or gifts are send to their home or office. Instead, if you are motivated to do so, please make a contribution to the Wisconsin Foundation for School Music, a wonderful organization which supports music opportunities, teachers, and scholarships for students in Milwaukee and throughout Wisconsin. A donation page is here. Even if you do not plan to contribute, please list that page and give yourself a few minutes to watch a beautiful tribute video that Wisconsin Public Television produced to honor Al when he received his lifetime achievement award in October."

Jarreau rose to fame after his 1977 debut album We Got By rose to critical acclaim. He won 7 Grammy Awards throughout his career and gave us a slew of hits, including "Mornin'," "After All, "We're In This Love Together" and, of course, the theme to the TV show Moonlighting.

He is survived by his wife, Susan, and his son, Ryan. Our thoughts are with his friends, family and fans during this difficult time.

Written by Evelyn Diaz

(Photo: Frank Hoensch/Redferns)

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