Country Singer Kane Brown Admits Believing He Was White...Until Being Called The N-Word

LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 09:  Kane Brown accepts the Favorite Male Artist - Country award onstage during the 2018 American Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on October 9, 2018 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Country Singer Kane Brown Admits Believing He Was White...Until Being Called The N-Word

“I didn’t know that until I was 7 or 8 years old. I thought I was full white..."

Published November 27th

Country music breakout star Kane Brown found his place in Hollywood among the Western swing circle after nabbing three 2018 American Music Award and a top Billboard 200 spot with his Experiment album this year.

But before reaching these milestone achievements, Brown’s path to finding himself proved to be far more challenging, as he revealed to Peoplemagazine on the topic of race. 

  1. The 25-year-old told ‘People’ that he was unaware of his biracial identity up until his school-age years

    “I’m biracial; I didn’t know that until I was 7 or 8 years old,” he shared“I thought I was full white, which honestly, I can’t even really say because I didn’t see colors.” Peoplefurther explained that Brown was born to and raised by his white mother Tabatha, as his part-Black and Cherokee father was absent in his life. 

  2. Brown explained that it wasn’t until he was teased and mocked for his skin color by his middle school classmates in Georgia that he came face-to-face with race

    He added that though he’d already discovered that he was biracial, he “wasn’t thinking anything of it.” Once the “Homesick” singer was introduced to the n-word, however, it added an unfamiliar weight onto him. “…But then I started getting called the N-word,” he said. “I didn’t even know what it meant. I learned what it meant, and that’s when it started affecting me. I got in fights over it when I was little.”

  3. He eventually got over the troubling experiences and tapped into music, which he claims helped him persevere past the adversity

    “They just made me stronger,” Brown explained. “I guess it was God. Hopefully I can help kids and they can end up being stronger in the long run, too.”

    Read his full People profile where he explains the controversy here.

Written by Diamond Alexis

(Photo: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

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