This Dodge Ram Super Bowl Ad Is Getting Slammed For Using A Martin Luther King Jr. Sermon To Sell Cars During Black History Month

MONTGOMERY, AL - MARCH 25:  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking before crowd of 25,000 Selma To Montgomery, Alabama civil rights marchers, in front of Montgomery, Alabama state capital building. On March 25, 1965 in Montgomery, Alabama. (Photo: Stephen F. Somerstein/Getty Images)

This Dodge Ram Super Bowl Ad Is Getting Slammed For Using A Martin Luther King Jr. Sermon To Sell Cars During Black History Month

"Is it possible that not a single Black person works at Dodge's ad agency?"

Published February 5th

Super Bowl commercials are known for being the highlight of the game for all people, regardless of their interest in the football game. Although many of the commercials during last night's game did their job of entertaining the millions of people watching, one commercial for Dodge Ram trucks that used Martin Luther King Jr.'s voice undoubtedly missed the mark. 

After the commercial aired, Dodge received all the wrong kinds of attention. 

  1. A speech delivered by Dr. King on Feb. 4, 1968, was used as the backdrop for the ad, which ultimately attempted to sell trucks
  2. Immediately, the Dodge ad team was called out for using a civil rights icon to sell cars
  3. Not to mention MLK vehemently opposed 'the evils of capitalism'
  4. And Dodge's parent company, Fiat Chrysler, was embroiled in a racial discrimination controversy last year
  5. Bernice King, daughter of Martin Luther King Jr., and the King Center denied giving permission for his voice to be used
  6. Despite the ad's tone-deaf execution, some were able to joke about the commercial
  7. Needless to say, Dodge should be looking to up the company diversity

Written by Rachel Herron

(Photo: Stephen F. Somerstein/Getty Images)

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