Outraged Friends Defend Women's March Organizer Tamika Mallory After She Was Called An Anti-Semite

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 07:  National Co-Chair of the Womens March on Washington Tamika D. Mallory speaks onstage during the 2017 Women of the World (WOW) Festival at The Apollo Theater on May 7, 2017 in New York City.  (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)

Outraged Friends Defend Women's March Organizer Tamika Mallory After She Was Called An Anti-Semite

The activist was attacked for attending a speech by Minister Louis Farrakhan.

Published March 7, 2018

After attending a speech by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan that many called anti-Semitic, Women's March co-chair Tamika Mallory has been forced to defend herself after being a supporter of anti-Semitism. 

Last month, Mallory attended Farrakhan’s Chicago speech, wherein he gave her a special shout out while also using phrases such as "Satanic Jew."

In his speech, Farrakhan referred to “powerful Jews” who run the government and control Hollywood. He also blamed the Jewish people for apartheid, and praised anti-Semitic comments made by Billy Graham and Richard Nixon.

Farrakhan said, “the Jews were responsible for all of this filth and degenerate behavior that Hollywood is putting out turning men into women and women into men,” according Refinery29.

  1. After the speech, many people called on the Women’s March to denounce the comments
  2. Eventually people went as far as to call Mallory and leaders of the Women's March Anti-Semitic
  3. In a series of Tweets, Mallory was forced to defend herself and her activism
  4. Eventually friends of Mallory rushed to her defense and said although they do not support Farrakhan that does not mean Mallory should be labeled a bigot
  5. The Women's March has since tweeted an official statement denouncing all forms of hate

    "We will not tolerate anti-Semitism, racism, misogyny, homophobia, and transphobia and we condemn these expressions of hatred in all forms," the statement read. "We love and value our sister and co-President Tamika Mallory, who has played a key role in shaping these conversations. Neither we nor she shy away from the fact that intersectional movement building is difficult and often painful."

Written by Rachel Herron

(Photo: Noam Galai/WireImage)

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