Family Of ISIS Bride Hoda Muthana Files Lawsuit Against Trump To Allow Her To Return To The US

Family Of ISIS Bride Hoda Muthana Files Lawsuit Against Trump To Allow Her To Return To The US

The 24-year-old mother moved to Syria in 2014 where she got married twice to Islamic fighters who died in combat.

Published February 22nd

The family of the 24-year-old American-born ISIS bride who moved to Syria as a college student is suing President Donald Trump in order to allow her to return home.

In 2014, Hoda Muthana, who was born in New Jersey but lived in Alabama, left the University of Alabama at Birmingham to join the Islamic State in Syria. While with the Islamic State, Muthana was married twice to different ISIS fighters who both died in combat, reported USA Today.

Last year, Muthana and her baby fled to the al-Hawl refugee camp after the collapse of the ISIS caliphate in Syria and Iraq.

Now, she thinks she should have "no problem" returning to the U.S. even though Donald Trump told Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to refuse her entry.

Muthana, who is currently staying in a refugee camp with her 18-month-old son, is pushing back on Pompeo’s claim that she is “not a citizen.”

"I know in fact that I was a citizen," she told NBC News. "When I tried filing for a passport it was very easy. It came in 10 days. So, I thought I didn’t have a problem, and I’m sure there is no problem and I know my lawyer hopefully is working on it and he will win the case.”

Muthana is also not in denial about what will happen to her when she returns home.

"Of course I’ll be given jail time,” she admitted.

Muthana is the daughter of a former Yemeni diplomat. According to her family's lawyers, the U.S. government said she’s not a citizen because her father held diplomatic status at the time of her birth in Hackensack, New Jersey.

According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, a person born in the U.S. to an accredited foreign diplomatic officer is not subject to U.S. law and is not automatically considered an American citizen at birth.

The family's lawyers are arguing that at the time of Muthana's birth, her father was no longer a diplomat. They are also saying that she was granted a legitimate U.S. passport when she first left for Syria.

Now, Muthana said she fears for her life from other ISIS wives who want to harm her for speaking out against the group. Muthana also said she is no longer a “radical.” She said she regrets joining ISIS and feels she was initially “brainwashed” online.

Written by BET Staff

(Photo: ABC News)

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