NYC Mayoral Candidate Eric Adams Set To Meet With President Biden On Gun Violence

NYC Mayoral Candidate Eric Adams Set To Meet With President Biden On Gun Violence

The meeting with law enforcement and municipal leaders will discuss the nationwide surge in gun violence.

PUBLISHED ON : JULY 12, 2021 / 01:10 PM

Written by Quinci LeGardye

Eric Adams, who won the Democratic nomination for mayor of New York City will meet with President Biden at the White House on Monday (July 12) to discuss solutions for the nationwide surge in gun violence.

Adams is set to join a meeting Biden is holding with Attorney General Merrick Garland and other law enforcement and municipal leaders, CBS News reports. He is attending in his capacity as Brooklyn borough president, according to White House Officials.

Adams, a former New York police captain, took the Democratic primary  last week by focusing his campaign on his law enforcement background and his plans to combat New York City’s recent surge in gun violence.

In an appearance on ABC’s This Week, Adams told host George Stephanopoulos said the federal and local governments should work together to crack down on illegal guns in New York.

"We feed crime in America and in New York. We need to stop the feeders of crime. And then we must have an immediate response. We should create something like a JTTF — Joint Terrorism Task Force. This is what we did to fight terrorism," he said.

RELATED: Eric Adams Edges Out Rivals To Win Democratic Primary In New York City Mayoral Race

During his campaign, Adams rallied against his Democratoc opponents who called to defund the police. Rather than decreasing the New York Police Department’s budget, Adams supported reworking the police budget and targeting inefficiencies. 

Biden has also criticized calls to defund the police, but supports a bipartisan effort toward police reform through redefining the protections of qualified immunity. Qualified immunity currently prevents civilians from suing public officials, including police officers, in civil court for wrongdoing conducted while the officials are on duty.

Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images

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