Here's How Siri Can Low-Key Help Save You From Police Brutality

Policeman pulls over a driver for speeding, getting out of police car to write a traffic ticket.

Here's How Siri Can Low-Key Help Save You From Police Brutality

“Hey, Siri, I’m getting pulled over.”

Published 1 week ago

As we all know, police brutality is very real and it can be terrifying to see the blue and red lights flashing in your rear-view mirrors—especially when you're all alone with no one to witness the interactions. 

Well, thanks to a new “shortcut,” that will allow iPhone users to use Siri to discreetly record police encounters, users might feel a little bit better after simply by saying, “Hey Siri, I’m getting pulled over,” according to USA Today. 

Policeman pulls over a driver for speeding, getting out of police car to write a traffic ticket.
(Photo: Getty)

The add-on, titled "Police," is the brainchild of Redditer Robert Petersen of Arizona and was created to covertly record law enforcement officials to "keep everyone safe and honest."

“I have noticed in reading news articles and seeing reports on TV that in many cases you end up with police saying one thing happened and the citizen being pulled over saying another,” Petersen shared with USA Today. “And how do you determine truth? Sometimes the police have body cams, sometimes not, and even when they do it’s not always released in a timely manner.”

According to the report by the media outlet, here's how it works:

“Once Siri is alerted about the traffic stop, the program springs into action to pause any music that may be playing, turn down your screen brightness and puts your phone in Do Not Disturb mode. Siri then sends a text message to a designated emergency contact to let them know what’s happening."

The front camera turns on to record video of the occurrence. 

Once users stop the recording, a copy of the video is sent to a specified contact, the brightness returns to normal, and Do Not Disturb is disabled.”

“When dealing with being pulled over and interacting with law enforcement, you want as little distraction as possible, and that includes music, bright screens and notifications coming in,” Petersen stated. “You want to be focused on the encounter at hand and don’t want any unnecessary distraction to yourself or to law enforcement personnel.”

What do you think, BET family? Do you think it'll help?

Written by BET Staff

(Photo: Getty)

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