This Day in Black History: Feb. 4, 1986

The U.S. Postal Service issued a commemorative stamp honoring Sojourner Truth.

Posted: 02/04/2013 08:00 AM EST

(Photo: US Postal Service)

On Feb. 4, 1986, the U.S. Postal Service issued a commemorative postage stamp honoring abolitionist and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth as part of its Black Heritage series.

Sojourner Truth was born Isabella Baumfree in 1797 on the Hardenbergh plantation in upstate New York. In 1826, Truth managed to escape to freedom and became known as a fearless advocate for enslaved African-Americans and women.

She is best known for her "Ain't I a Woman?" speech that challenged gender and racial inequalities. During the Civil War, Truth became involved in the war effort by recruiting Black troops for the Union Army. After the war, she tried unsuccessfully to secure land grants from the federal government for former slaves.

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