Report: Bay Area Rapper The Jacka Shot to Death in Oakland

Report: Bay Area Rapper The Jacka Shot to Death in Oakland

Founding member of the Mob Figaz pronounced dead at local hospital, suspect still at large.

Published February 3, 2015

(Photo: The Jacka via Instagram)

Bay Area rapper The Jacka was shot and killed in East Oakland Monday (Feb. 2) night, CBS San Francisco reports. He was 37.

Jacka, whose birth name is Dominic Newton, was shot in the head, according to SFGate.com. Witnesses say he was gunned down on the 9400 block of MacArthur Blvd. around 8:15 p.m. He was pronounced dead at Oakland’s Highland Hospital. 

Authorities have yet to officially announce him as the shooting victim, although a reporter from the Bay Area’s KPIX News confirmed the fatality. The gunman and motive remain unknown.

By late Monday night, dedications were already pouring in for the fallen rapper via social media. Bay Area native G-Eazy tweeted, “Damn... RIP @theJacka the Bay Area lost a legend,”  while Fashawn mentioned collaborating with Jacka. “It was an honor to work with you and build before you left king,” he tweeted. “The coast lost a real one.” Nipsey Hussle posted a few tributes to Jacka, writing next to one video,”His city Loved him. My n***a rep the bay well #RESTEASY”

Born in Pittsburgh, Calif., Jacka began his rap career in the late ‘90s as a member of the Mob Figaz crew. He left the group to go solo in 2001, putting out a number of studio albums, mixtapes and compilations over the last several years, including 2014’s What Happened to the World, and a joint LP with Freeway titled, Highway Robbery.

His shooting marks the 11th homicide in Oakland since that start of the year.     

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Written by Latifah Muhammad

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