Music Stars and the Academy Awards

Common, John Legend win Oscar for Selma's "Glory."

Music Stars and the Academy Awards - Fresh off a win for Best Original Song at the Golden Globe Awards, Common and John Legend, the G.O.O.D. Music cohorts, picked up an Oscar for Best Original Song for "Glory." In a moving acceptance speech, John said, "Selma is now because the struggle for justice is right now.... We are with you, we see you, we love you, and march on."(Photo: Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

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Music Stars and the Academy Awards - Fresh off a win for Best Original Song at the Golden Globe Awards, Common and John Legend, the G.O.O.D. Music cohorts, picked up an Oscar for Best Original Song for "Glory." In a moving acceptance speech, John said, "Selma is now because the struggle for justice is right now.... We are with you, we see you, we love you, and march on."(Photo: Jason Merritt/Getty Images)

Lionel Richie (Won) - Lionel Richie’s classic love ballad “Say You, Say Me” earned him another Oscar in 1985 when he won Best Original Song after the hit record was featured in the film White Knights.(Photo: SCOTT FLYNN/AFP/Getty Images)

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Lionel Richie (Won) - Lionel Richie’s classic love ballad “Say You, Say Me” earned him another Oscar in 1985 when he won Best Original Song after the hit record was featured in the film White Knights.(Photo: SCOTT FLYNN/AFP/Getty Images)

Irena Cara (Won) - Fame actress Irene Cara won the Best Original Song Oscar in 1983 for co-writing the hit single “What a Feeling” from the film Flashdance.(Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)

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Irena Cara (Won) - Fame actress Irene Cara won the Best Original Song Oscar in 1983 for co-writing the hit single “What a Feeling” from the film Flashdance.(Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)

Photo By Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage

Herbie Hancock (Won) - Jazz legend Herbie Hancock won the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Score in 1987 for the film Round Midnight. Loosely based on the lives of jazz musicians Lester Young and Bud Powell, Herbie also starred in the film. (Photo: Darlene Hammond/Getty Images)

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Herbie Hancock (Won) - Jazz legend Herbie Hancock won the Academy Award for Best Music, Original Score in 1987 for the film Round Midnight. Loosely based on the lives of jazz musicians Lester Young and Bud Powell, Herbie also starred in the film. (Photo: Darlene Hammond/Getty Images)

Prince (Won) - The Purple One took home an Academy Award in 1984 for Best Original Song Score for his film Purple Rain. Prince was at the top of the world that year and even Hollywood had to respect his gangsta. (Photo: Frank Micelotta/Getty Images)

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Prince (Won) - The Purple One took home an Academy Award in 1984 for Best Original Song Score for his film Purple Rain. Prince was at the top of the world that year and even Hollywood had to respect his gangsta. (Photo: Frank Micelotta/Getty Images)

Photo By Photo: Frank Micelotta/Getty Images

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Pharrell (Nominated) - Skateboard P was nominated last year in the Best Original Song category for his platinum smash "Happy" from the film Despicable Me 2. Pharrell also performed at the show and had everyone feeling elated.(Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

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Pharrell (Nominated) - Skateboard P was nominated last year in the Best Original Song category for his platinum smash "Happy" from the film Despicable Me 2. Pharrell also performed at the show and had everyone feeling elated.(Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Diana Ross (Nominated) - For her work in the 1972 movie Lady Sings the Blues, about the legendary singer Billie Holiday, Diana Ross, playing Holiday, received a nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role. The soundtrack, which featured Ross singing Holiday’s songs, soared to No. 1 on the Billboard 200. (Photo: SAGA/Landov)

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Diana Ross (Nominated) - For her work in the 1972 movie Lady Sings the Blues, about the legendary singer Billie Holiday, Diana Ross, playing Holiday, received a nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role. The soundtrack, which featured Ross singing Holiday’s songs, soared to No. 1 on the Billboard 200. (Photo: SAGA/Landov)

Stevie Wonder (Won) - Stevie Wonder has accumulated countless awards throughout his illustrious career. It’s really no surprise, then, that an Academy Award is on that lengthy list. In 1984, he won the award for Best Original Song for “I Just Called to Say I Love You,” which was featured in the film The Woman in Red. (Photo: FayesVision/WENN.com)

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Stevie Wonder (Won) - Stevie Wonder has accumulated countless awards throughout his illustrious career. It’s really no surprise, then, that an Academy Award is on that lengthy list. In 1984, he won the award for Best Original Song for “I Just Called to Say I Love You,” which was featured in the film The Woman in Red. (Photo: FayesVision/WENN.com)

Isaac Hayes (Won) - In 1971, “Theme From Shaft” hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. Only a few months later, the hit was awarded Best Original Song at the Academy Awards and Isaac Hayes became just the third African-American to win an Oscar. (Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

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Isaac Hayes (Won) - In 1971, “Theme From Shaft” hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. Only a few months later, the hit was awarded Best Original Song at the Academy Awards and Isaac Hayes became just the third African-American to win an Oscar. (Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

Eminem (Won) - Released in 2002, Eminem’s film 8 Mile was generally well received by critics and grossed almost $250 million at the box office. The soundtrack’s lead single, “Lose Yourself,” became an inescapable hit, hitting No. 1 on charts in 24 countries; today, it’s still arguably Em’s biggest hit. It was fitting, then, that it took home the Academy Award for Best Original Song at that year’s ceremony. Mr. Mathers was not on hand to accept the honor, which was the first in history for a rap song. (Photo: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

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Eminem (Won) - Released in 2002, Eminem’s film 8 Mile was generally well received by critics and grossed almost $250 million at the box office. The soundtrack’s lead single, “Lose Yourself,” became an inescapable hit, hitting No. 1 on charts in 24 countries; today, it’s still arguably Em’s biggest hit. It was fitting, then, that it took home the Academy Award for Best Original Song at that year’s ceremony. Mr. Mathers was not on hand to accept the honor, which was the first in history for a rap song. (Photo: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

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Three 6 Mafia (Won) - An appropriate musical complement to the 2005 film Hustle & Flow, “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” brought Three 6 Mafia to the limelight when the song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 2006. It was just the second time a rap song had won an award, and the Memphis natives performed the hit live that night. (Photo: Francis Specker/Landov)

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Three 6 Mafia (Won) - An appropriate musical complement to the 2005 film Hustle & Flow, “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” brought Three 6 Mafia to the limelight when the song won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 2006. It was just the second time a rap song had won an award, and the Memphis natives performed the hit live that night. (Photo: Francis Specker/Landov)

Diddy (Won) - In 2012, Undefeated was awarded Best Documentary. Among those that got to enjoy the spoils of victory was Diddy, who signed on to executive produce a remake of the film, and in the process was given a producer credit on the original, which was about a high school football team.    (Photo: PA PHOTOS/LANDOV)

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Diddy (Won) - In 2012, Undefeated was awarded Best Documentary. Among those that got to enjoy the spoils of victory was Diddy, who signed on to executive produce a remake of the film, and in the process was given a producer credit on the original, which was about a high school football team.    (Photo: PA PHOTOS/LANDOV)

Queen Latifah (Nominated) - Chicago had a big night at the Academy Awards in 2003. The musical won six awards including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress. Catherine Zeta-Jones won the latter, but in the category, she squared up against Queen Latifah, who was also in the film. In 2009, Latifah was a presenter at the show. (Photo: Brad Weingarden/PictureGroup)

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Queen Latifah (Nominated) - Chicago had a big night at the Academy Awards in 2003. The musical won six awards including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress. Catherine Zeta-Jones won the latter, but in the category, she squared up against Queen Latifah, who was also in the film. In 2009, Latifah was a presenter at the show. (Photo: Brad Weingarden/PictureGroup)

Will Smith (Nominated) - These days, most people probably think of Will Smith more as an actor than a rapper, and it’s in large part thanks to performances like the two he gave in his Oscar-nominated roles. Each time, the nomination came in the Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role category, with 2002’s Ali and 2007’s Pursuit of Happyness, respectively. (Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

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Will Smith (Nominated) - These days, most people probably think of Will Smith more as an actor than a rapper, and it’s in large part thanks to performances like the two he gave in his Oscar-nominated roles. Each time, the nomination came in the Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role category, with 2002’s Ali and 2007’s Pursuit of Happyness, respectively. (Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Jennifer Hudson (Won) - Considering it was her first role, what Jennifer Hudson did in Dreamgirls is pretty breathtaking. The former American Idol winner earned dozens of nominations across an array of ceremonies including, most notably, a victory in the Best Supporting Actress category at the 2006 Oscars. (Photo: Evan Agostini/Getty Images)

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Jennifer Hudson (Won) - Considering it was her first role, what Jennifer Hudson did in Dreamgirls is pretty breathtaking. The former American Idol winner earned dozens of nominations across an array of ceremonies including, most notably, a victory in the Best Supporting Actress category at the 2006 Oscars. (Photo: Evan Agostini/Getty Images)