Why They Run: Lisa Fritsch for Texas Governor

A look at the candidate and where she stands on key issues.

Meet Lisa Fritsch - Radio host and political commentator Lisa Fritsch says her bid to become the 48th governor of Texas is a calling. And although she has never served in elective office, the married mother of two believes that her compassionate values will help her defeat the presumed front runner for the GOP nomination, attorney general Greg Abbott. Fritsch also believes that as a woman, she's in a much stronger position than Abbott to best Democratic state Sen. Wendy Davis. Read here to learn more about what makes Fritsch run. ? Joyce Jones (Photo: Courtesy of Todd White/Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

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Meet Lisa Fritsch - Radio host and political commentator Lisa Fritsch says her bid to become the 48th governor of Texas is a calling. And although she has never served in elective office, the married mother of two believes that her compassionate values will help her defeat the presumed front runner for the GOP nomination, attorney general Greg Abbott. Fritsch also believes that as a woman, she's in a much stronger position than Abbott to best Democratic state Sen. Wendy Davis. Read here to learn more about what makes Fritsch run. – Joyce Jones (Photo: Courtesy of Todd White/Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

Why She's a Republican - "Conservative values have the power to positively transform the lives of every person, to lift them out of poverty toward prosperity and independence. Republican values are compassionate and represent dignity for the purpose of the individual," Fritsch says.(Photo: Courtesy of Todd White/Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

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Why She's a Republican - "Conservative values have the power to positively transform the lives of every person, to lift them out of poverty toward prosperity and independence. Republican values are compassionate and represent dignity for the purpose of the individual," Fritsch says.(Photo: Courtesy of Todd White/Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

A Political Awakening - After graduating from college, Fritsch wanted to increase awareness of conservative values among Black and Latino women. She began writing articles, which led to talk radio and as people started to take notice, she became more politically active. When Mitt Romney lost the 2012 presidential election, she saw an even greater need for the GOP to expand its base.  (Photo: Ted Parker Jr/Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

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A Political Awakening - After graduating from college, Fritsch wanted to increase awareness of conservative values among Black and Latino women. She began writing articles, which led to talk radio and as people started to take notice, she became more politically active. When Mitt Romney lost the 2012 presidential election, she saw an even greater need for the GOP to expand its base. (Photo: Ted Parker Jr/Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

The Voice of Inclusion - "It's time for me to step forward and be the voice of inclusion that this party desperately needs. And, it's not so I can defend a bunch of establishment Republicans, but so that I can reach my people, my community, who I don't think identifies with us but whose values I know we represent," Fritsch says.(Photo: Ted Parker Jr/Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

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The Voice of Inclusion - "It's time for me to step forward and be the voice of inclusion that this party desperately needs. And, it's not so I can defend a bunch of establishment Republicans, but so that I can reach my people, my community, who I don't think identifies with us but whose values I know we represent," Fritsch says.(Photo: Ted Parker Jr/Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

Why First Bid Is for Governor - "I step in where there's a need at the appointed time. Me coming into politics isn't about climbing up the political ladder ... starting with a House seat and waiting my turn," Fritsch says.(Photo: Courtesy of Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

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Why First Bid Is for Governor - "I step in where there's a need at the appointed time. Me coming into politics isn't about climbing up the political ladder ... starting with a House seat and waiting my turn," Fritsch says.(Photo: Courtesy of Lisa Fritsch for Governor)

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Stood Her Ground - Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis achieved national acclaim after speaking from her chamber's floor for 13 hours, which helped defeat a controversial abortion bill.     (Photo: Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)

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The Wendy Factor - "This particular race is critical at this time simply because our [Democratic] opposition is also a woman, a single mother raised by a single mother," says Fritsch, refering to state Sen. Wendy Davis. "I thought that [the other Republican candidates] would have a very hard time defending against that and would be behind in the cultural conversation."  (Photo: Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)

Leadership Strategy - “I plan to lead from the people's will, not crony capitalism and big money and bring people with me from all walks of life, to inspire all Texans to rise higher and above and beyond where they are now and be a part of this economy. I am the only candidate with an anti-poverty agenda," Fristsch says.   (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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Leadership Strategy - “I plan to lead from the people's will, not crony capitalism and big money and bring people with me from all walks of life, to inspire all Texans to rise higher and above and beyond where they are now and be a part of this economy. I am the only candidate with an anti-poverty agenda," Fristsch says. (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Fritsch vs. Frontrunner Abbott - "I am going to take this message across Texas and make voters understand the urgency of this race. I'm going to go where he is not and focus on all Texans, including those who are concerned about the 18.4 percent of poverty, who want dignified and compassionate immigration reform, and who are for life but want to elevate that conversation in a new way," Fritsch says. (Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

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Fritsch vs. Frontrunner Abbott - "I am going to take this message across Texas and make voters understand the urgency of this race. I'm going to go where he is not and focus on all Texans, including those who are concerned about the 18.4 percent of poverty, who want dignified and compassionate immigration reform, and who are for life but want to elevate that conversation in a new way," Fritsch says. (Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

What the Polls Are Saying - Fritsch feels confident that Abbott's frontrunner status could easily slide. She says that local polls show that Abbott's name recognition isn't that great and that he would likely be in a run-off for the nomination. "And they show this party needs a candidate like me because he's vulnerable to Wendy Davis," Fritsch says.(Photo: Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)

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What the Polls Are Saying - Fritsch feels confident that Abbott's frontrunner status could easily slide. She says that local polls show that Abbott's name recognition isn't that great and that he would likely be in a run-off for the nomination. "And they show this party needs a candidate like me because he's vulnerable to Wendy Davis," Fritsch says.(Photo: Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)

Fritsch vs. Davis - ?I see her having a lot harder time enforcing the Democratic playbook against somebody like me because I also have a story to tell about being raised by a single mother who [didn't rely on government assistance]. I am pro-life, but understand as a woman the dignity of women who are faced with these choices matters and should be talked about from a place of love and compassion," Fritsch says. (Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

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Fritsch vs. Davis - “I see her having a lot harder time enforcing the Democratic playbook against somebody like me because I also have a story to tell about being raised by a single mother who [didn't rely on government assistance]. I am pro-life, but understand as a woman the dignity of women who are faced with these choices matters and should be talked about from a place of love and compassion," Fritsch says. (Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

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What Do Blacks Really Think About Voter ID Laws? - According to a recent Fox News poll, 51 percent of Black voters support laws requiring individuals to present a photo ID at the polls. It was a close call: 46 percent of respondents said they oppose the laws. The poll surveyed 1,025 voters from all major demographics.(Photo: REUTERS/Randall Hill)

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On Voting Rights - Fritsch does not oppose asking voters to present a photo ID at the polls, and does not think that it should be a difficult process to obtain one or used to intimidate people from going to the polls. She also doesn't agree with efforts to shorten early voting periods and other policies that make it more difficult for people to vote. "Early voting is very important for getting out the vote and encouraging people to vote easily and conveniently," Fritsch said.(Photo: REUTERS/Randall Hill)

On Gun Control - "I am a fierce defender of the Second Amendment, however there should be some serious measures in place to make sure people carrying guns are fit to do so," Fritsch said.  (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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On Gun Control - "I am a fierce defender of the Second Amendment, however there should be some serious measures in place to make sure people carrying guns are fit to do so," Fritsch said. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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On Affirmative Action in Higher Education - "I think the worst thing you can do to young African-American, Hispanic and other minority students is to put them in a position where people feel like they've gotten something they haven't earned or aren't capable of competing with their white peers," Fritsch said. (Photo: Getty Images)

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On Affordable Health Care - “The Affordable Care Act rollout has been sloppy and I don't think you can trust it. Just because something has a good intention doesn't mean it's practical or works. Ideally, everyone should have access to quality health care but practically, the health law is dysfunctional and doesn't work," Fritsch says. As governor, she would allow voters to decide whether Texas should participate in the health insurance exchange marketplace.  (Photo: Adam Berry/Getty Images)