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NASA Engineer Builds Fart Spraying Glitter Bomb Trap To Stop Package Thieves

Porch-pirates, beware.

If you’ve been on the Internet for the last month, then you’ve probably seen at least one video of a package thief caught on a surveillance camera. While the recordings work to possible identify the “porch pirate,” no one has successfully been able to stop a thief in action. This all changed when ex-NASA engineer and YouTuber Mark Rober decided to create the ultimate device to trap someone going for mail.

In a video shared to YouTube, Rober explained how he designed a trap that entices a thief with its Apple HomePod-like shape. However, when someone goes to steal the package, a bomb of glitter and fart scent explodes in the air.

Rober got the idea after catching a couple stealing a package on his front porch.

"If you've ever been in a situation like this, you just sort of feel violated," Rober explains in the video. "I took this to the police, and even with the video evidence, they said it was just not worth their time to look into... I just felt like something needs to be done to take a stand against dishonest punks like this."

When the booby-trapped package Rober built is opened, a mechanism hurls up a wave of fine glitter. Then, the foul odor of a fart is sprayed into the air every 30 seconds.

Rober also included four phones with recording abilities and a GPS locator so he could find the box afterwards.

It appeared Rober's trap was very needed because at least five separate people fell victim to the glitter bomb. 

"The moral of the story is, just don’t take other peoples’ stuff," Rober says. "Not only is it not cool, but on the plus side, you’ll never find yourself in this situation."

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