BET Wire: Holder Under Fire; Bye-Bye Bachmann, Hello West

Plus, more political news from the Beltway and beyond.

In Case You Missed It - Republicans leave President Obama scratching his head; Ben Carson kind of blames the spread of measles on immigrants; one lawmaker thinks it's OK if your food service worker doesn't wash his hands after a bathroom break ? and more. ? Joyce Jones (@BETpolitichick)

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In Case You Missed It - Congressional lawmakers may be home for a week but Attorney General Eric Holder is still very much on their radar; Republican firebrand Michele Bachmann is getting out of politics; former congressman Allen West is "keeping an eye on Washington" — and more. – Joyce Jones

Idiots in Charge - The Daily Caller has really stepped in it. On May 30, the conservative website posted a story about a Chicago-based aspiring rapper who dubs himself Rhymes Priebus, as a tribute to Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus. Then it tweeted this: ?Hey @Reince, why didn?t you tell us you were moonlighting as a rapper? Turns out our GOP Chair is HNIC?,? refererncing the slang term ?Head N-word in Charge.? The tweet was later removed and an apology was issued.  (Photo: Courtesy of The Daily Caller)

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Idiots in Charge - The Daily Caller has really stepped in it. On May 30, the conservative website posted a story about a Chicago-based aspiring rapper who dubs himself Rhymes Priebus, as a tribute to Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus. Then it tweeted this: “Hey @Reince, why didn’t you tell us you were moonlighting as a rapper? Turns out our GOP Chair is HNIC…,” refererncing the slang term “Head N-word in Charge.” The tweet was later removed and an apology was issued. (Photo: Courtesy of The Daily Caller)

Romneys Weigh In - Not that anyone asked her, but Ann Romney, wife of failed GOP nominee Mitt Romney, said on CBS's This Morning that recent White House controversies have caused a "breach of trust" between Americans and government. Her husband, in a Wall Street Journal interview, expressed "disappointment" in Obama's second term so far.  (Photo: This Morning via CBS)

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Romneys Weigh In - Not that anyone asked her, but Ann Romney, wife of failed GOP nominee Mitt Romney, said on CBS's This Morning that recent White House controversies have caused a "breach of trust" between Americans and government. Her husband, in a Wall Street Journal interview, expressed "disappointment" in Obama's second term so far. (Photo: This Morning via CBS)

Sen. Elbert Guillory - Louisiana state Sen. Elbert Guillory made headlines in 2013 when he switched his party affiliation from Democrat to Republican. It wasn't the first time, however. He was a Republican before he became a Democrat in 2007.(Photo: Erika Goldring/Getty Images)

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Party Switcher - Louisiana now has its first Black Republican state senator since Reconstruction. Former Democratic Sen. Elbert Guillory announced on May 31 that he is now a Republican. It's reportedly the second time he's made such a switch. Guillory was a Republican, The Times-Picayune reports, before running for a seat in the state's House chamber.  (Photo: Erika Goldring/Getty Images)

There She Goes Again - Everybody knows Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minnesota) hates Obamacare, but is she calling the president a drug dealer? In an interview with the conservative Web site WorldNetDaily, she said, ?President Obama can?t wait to get Americans addicted to the crack cocaine of dependency on more government health care.?(Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

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Bachmann Bows Out - Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachman, who ran unsuccessfully for president in 2012, has decided she won't seek a fifth term in Congress. In a video released in the dark of night, the tea party darling made famous for outlandish declarations, insisted her decision “was not influenced by any concerns about my being re-elected” or ethics investigations, but didn't outline what did influence the decision. (Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Sometimes It Doesn't Get Better - The House Judiciary Committee is looking into whether Holder lied under oath in testimony related to the Justice Department's surveillance of reporters. In addition, lawmakers are questioning whether it's appropriate for Holder to lead an investigation on the department's handling of reporters. Some are calling for his resignation. (Photo: AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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Sometimes It Doesn't Get Better - The House Judiciary Committee is looking into whether Holder lied under oath in testimony related to the Justice Department's surveillance of reporters. In addition, lawmakers are questioning whether it's appropriate for Holder to lead an investigation on the department's handling of reporters. Some are calling for his resignation. (Photo: AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Twin Peaks - Aides say Holder ?felt a creeping sense of personal remorse? while reading a Washington Post report on a DOJ investigation of Fox News reporter James Rosen's records and suggestion it might indict Rosen for seeking sensitive information about North Korea. It could be because he signed off on the search warrant to access Rosen's email and telephone records, as well as his parents' phone records increasing the spotlight created by the Associated Press scandal.   (Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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Twin Peaks - Aides say Holder “felt a creeping sense of personal remorse” while reading a Washington Post report on a DOJ investigation of Fox News reporter James Rosen's records and suggestion it might indict Rosen for seeking sensitive information about North Korea. It could be because he signed off on the search warrant to access Rosen's email and telephone records, as well as his parents' phone records increasing the spotlight created by the Associated Press scandal. (Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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He's Back! - A mere five months after leaving Congress, former representative Allen West is living in Washington again, returning home to Florida on weekends to visit his family. West is the director and star of the conservative online program NextGeneration.Tv and a Fox News contributor. “I’m coming back here to keep an eye on Washington, D.C., and report back to people,” he told Buzzfeed.   (Photo: Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times /Landov)

Rush Limbaugh - Rush Limbaugh isn't even a sportscaster, but his controversial remarks on a sports television show landed him in hot water anyway. The opinionated political radio host set off a firestorm of backlash during an October 2003 appearance on ESPN?s Sunday NFL Countdown by suggesting that ?The media has been very desirous that a black quarterback do well? in reference to then-Philadelphia Eagles? QB Donovan McNabb. He was not yanked off the air by his The Rush Limbaugh Show radio program, but did resign from his post on ESPN. (Photo: Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images)

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Master-Servant - Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh has a unique take on bipartisan efforts by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and President Obama to rebuild areas damaged by Hurricane Sandy. “Obama has money. Governor Christie wants the money. Governor Christie needs the money, so the people will be helped,” Limbaugh said on his May 28 broadcast. “So, Christie praises Obama. It’s a master-servant relationship.” (Photo: Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images)

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Pants on Fire - A study conducted by George Mason University's Center for Media and Public Affairs has found that Republicans are more likely than Democrats to fudge the facts. The study found that since January, the fact-checking site PolitiFact has found 52 percent of Republican claims to be mostly or entirely false, compared to just 24 percent of Democrats' statements.(Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Take a Break - Former senator and Republican leader Bob Dole dissed his party's direction, lamenting that standard bearer Ronald Reagan would not be welcomed by today's GOP. ?I think they ought to put a sign on the national committee doors that says ?closed for repairs? until New Year?s Day next year and spend that time going over ideas and positive agendas,? Dole said on Fox News Sunday.(Photo: Courtesy FOX News Sunday)

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Take a Break - Former senator and Republican leader Bob Dole dissed his party's direction, lamenting that standard bearer Ronald Reagan would not be welcomed by today's GOP. “I think they ought to put a sign on the national committee doors that says ‘closed for repairs’ until New Year’s Day next year and spend that time going over ideas and positive agendas,” Dole said on Fox News Sunday.(Photo: Courtesy FOX News Sunday)

Lipstick on His Collar - In a lighthearted moment at a White House reception celebrating Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, Obama called out a supporter whose enthusiasm had left a mark. "I just want everybody to witness ? I do not want to be in trouble with Michelle. That's why I'm calling you out right in front of everybody," he told the "auntie" of American Idol star Jessica Sanchez to much laughter.  (Photo: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Lipstick on His Collar - In a lighthearted moment at a White House reception celebrating Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, Obama called out a supporter whose enthusiasm had left a mark. "I just want everybody to witness — I do not want to be in trouble with Michelle. That's why I'm calling you out right in front of everybody," he told the "auntie" of American Idol star Jessica Sanchez to much laughter. (Photo: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Furlough Friday - Employees at the IRS, EPA, HUD and OMB, about 115,000 people, had an extra long Memorial Day weekend. As a result of across-the-board budget cuts, Friday became an unpaid holiday for 5 percent of the federal workforce. (Photo: AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

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Furlough Friday - Employees at the IRS, EPA, HUD and OMB, about 115,000 people, had an extra long Memorial Day weekend. As a result of across-the-board budget cuts, Friday became an unpaid holiday for 5 percent of the federal workforce. (Photo: AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)