10 Political Rap Artists Who Aren't Public Enemy

Check out these artists who keep activism in their lyrics.

Others Who Didn't Believe the Hype - Public Enemy might get credit for ushering in the political era of rap, which they rightfully should, but there were other groups and artists who followed suit. Some were connected to their movement, others were inspired by them and continue to keep this style of rap alive. Ch-ch-check it out.  (Photo: Motown Records)

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Others Who Didn't Believe the Hype - Public Enemy might get credit for ushering in the political era of rap, which they rightfully should, but there were other groups and artists who followed suit. Some were connected to their movement, others were inspired by them and continue to keep this style of rap alive. Ch-ch-check it out. (Photo: Motown Records)

Poor Righteous Teachers -  From their classic cuts like "Rock Dis Funky Joint" to "Shakiyla" to even the name of this Jersey trio, the Poor Righteous Teachers put their status as Five Percenters front and center in their music. (Photo: Profile Records)

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1. Poor Righteous Teachers - Often times overlooked alongside Public Enemy and X-Clan, Poor Righteous Teachers also had pro-Black lyricism sprinkled in with their music, although their particular sound was a bit funkier than the other two (think bum-stiggity-bum raps with positive messages). (Photo: Profile Records)

2. KMD - A trio from Long Beach, NY, KMD, which stood for Kausin' Much Damage, also caused many headaches at their record label. They were known to record with fellow Five Percenters and were brash about their attitudes toward Black empowerment. It was their second album, Black Bastards (it's pictured above), that proved so controversial that they were dropped. Despite the controversy, one member, Zev Love X, managed to reinvent himself years later as the underground cult rap icon MF Doom.  (Photo: ReadyRock Records)

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2. KMD - A trio from Long Beach, NY, KMD, which stood for Kausin' Much Damage, also caused many headaches at their record label. They were known to record with fellow Five Percenters and were brash about their attitudes toward Black empowerment. It was their second album, Black Bastards (it's pictured above), that proved so controversial that they were dropped. Despite the controversy, one member, Zev Love X, managed to reinvent himself years later as the underground cult rap icon MF Doom. (Photo: ReadyRock Records)

3. X-Clan - X-Clan wasn't a far cry from KMD ? both groups had a distinct Afrocentric and Black empowerment element in their music. However, X-Clan didn't quite reach the same level of controversy that KMD did. They were never dropped by their label. The founding member, Professor X (RIP), was actually the son of activist Sonny Carson, whose bio was turned into a film. To X-Clan's credit, they also managed to create a strong network of equally minded artists, similar to how A Tribe Called Quest and Wu-Tang Clan kept a network of associates. (Photo: David Corio/Getty Images)

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3. X-Clan - X-Clan wasn't a far cry from KMD — both groups had a distinct Afrocentric and Black empowerment element in their music. However, X-Clan didn't quite reach the same level of controversy that KMD did. They were never dropped by their label. The founding member, Professor X (RIP), was actually the son of activist Sonny Carson, whose bio was turned into a film. To X-Clan's credit, they also managed to create a strong network of equally minded artists, similar to how A Tribe Called Quest and Wu-Tang Clan kept a network of associates. (Photo: David Corio/Getty Images)

4. Kam - Kam was known for his affiliation with Ice Cube early on in his career, which made sense given that the latter was also known for aggressive, socio-political lyrics. Kam's rhymes were more Nation of Islam influenced and radical than Cube's were, however.  (Photo: Interscope/Universal Records)

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4. Kam - Kam was known for his affiliation with Ice Cube early on in his career, which made sense given that the latter was also known for aggressive, socio-political lyrics. Kam's rhymes were more Nation of Islam influenced and radical than Cube's were, however. (Photo: Interscope/Universal Records)

5. Immortal Technique - A favorite among the college crowd, Immortal Technique was actually on Freestyle Friday many years ago. Since then, he has evolved into one of the most prolific and vocal artists to ever question government and first world politics in music.  (Photo: Chelsea Lauren/WireImage)

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5. Immortal Technique - A favorite among the college crowd, Immortal Technique was actually on Freestyle Friday many years ago. Since then, he has evolved into one of the most prolific and vocal artists to ever question government and first world politics in music. (Photo: Chelsea Lauren/WireImage)

6. Paris - If you think NWA was badass for disrespecting police and getting letters from the Feds, Paris upped the ante by making a song dedicated to killing former-president George H.W. Bush (the first Bush) in 1992.   (Photo: Guerilla Funk Records)

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6. Paris - If you think NWA was badass for disrespecting police and getting letters from the Feds, Paris upped the ante by making a song dedicated to killing former-president George H.W. Bush (the first Bush) in 1992. (Photo: Guerilla Funk Records)

7. Dead Prez - It's bigger than hip hop. Comprised of stic.man and M-1, the duo shot to modest levels of conscious rap fame during the early 2000s off the strength of their song "Hip-Hop" and their work with artists such as Mos Def and Talib Kweli. The aforementioned song was also featured on Chappelle's Show a few times. Their observational lyrics on racism and injustice have made them torchbearers for the same movement which PE started. (Photo: Bryan Bedder/Getty Images)

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7. Dead Prez - It's bigger than hip hop. Comprised of stic.man and M-1, the duo shot to modest levels of conscious rap fame during the early 2000s off the strength of their song "Hip-Hop" and their work with artists such as Mos Def and Talib Kweli. The aforementioned song was also featured on Chappelle's Show a few times. Their observational lyrics on racism and injustice have made them torchbearers for the same movement which PE started. (Photo: Bryan Bedder/Getty Images)

8. Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def) - Yasiin has collaborated with a few artists on this list. He's straddled the line between onscious emcee and political activist, but on many occasions these two worlds overlap. Unlike Paris, his music doesn't veer toward extremes. However, his penchant for hip hop that is self-reflective is apparent on his debut, Black on Both Sides.  (Photo: WENN)

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8. Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def) - Yasiin has collaborated with a few artists on this list. He's straddled the line between onscious emcee and political activist, but on many occasions these two worlds overlap. Unlike Paris, his music doesn't veer toward extremes. However, his penchant for hip hop that is self-reflective is apparent on his debut, Black on Both Sides. (Photo: WENN)

Brother Ali (Rhymesayers Entertainment to Warner Bros.) - It made sense when Brother Ali teamed with Rhymesayers Entertainment early in his career. He, like the label, is based in the Midwest; plus, there was something to his sound that felt quintessentially Rhymesayers-esque. That didn't stop him — nor should it have — from signing with Warner Bros. in the mid-2000s, through which he has released his last three albums in tandem with Rhymesayers. He experienced more commercial success on the major than he did when he was solely indie, while still managing to put out a product that satisfied his core. (Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

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9. Brother Ali - Though relatively new compared to some of these other acts, Ali's presence has been felt. His song "Uncle Sam Godd--n" has supposedly gotten him kicked off tours and dropped by sponsors for its criticism of war. (Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

10. The Coup - Coming straight out of Oakland, this hip hop/rap band has been rocking out for over 20 years and continues to put new generations of rap fans on to their funky brand of music. Although less aggressive than some of the other artists on this list, their diverse Bay Area roots are reflected in their eclectic sound and conscious lyrics.(Photo: Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)

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10. The Coup - Coming straight out of Oakland, this hip hop/rap band has been rocking out for over 20 years and continues to put new generations of rap fans on to their funky brand of music. Although less aggressive than some of the other artists on this list, their diverse Bay Area roots are reflected in their eclectic sound and conscious lyrics.(Photo: Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)