Seven Ways a Government Shutdown Could Affect You

Here's how things could change on Oct. 1.

Here We Go Again - Congressional Republicans and Democrats are engaged once again in a government shutdown showdown. The GOP-led House has passed a short-term budget that comes with a condition – defunding Obamacare. In response, President Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid have said, "no way." Unless the parties can reach an agreement, the federal government will close its doors on Oct. 1. Here's how such a move would impact you. -- By Joyce Jones   (Photos from left: AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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Here We Go Again - Congressional Republicans and Democrats are engaged once again in a government shutdown showdown. The GOP-led House has passed a short-term budget that comes with a condition – defunding Obamacare. In response, President Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid have said, "no way." Unless the parties can reach an agreement, the federal government will close its doors on Oct. 1. Here's how such a move would impact you. -- By Joyce Jones (Photos from left: AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

How About a Staycation? - Plans to visit national museums, parks and zoos will have to be put on hold. And if you don't already have a passport, you can forget about that European vacation or Caribbean getaway you've been planning for months.  (Photo: Photodisc/Getty Images)

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How About a Staycation? - Plans to visit national museums, parks and zoos will have to be put on hold. And if you don't already have a passport, you can forget about that European vacation or Caribbean getaway you've been planning for months. (Photo: Photodisc/Getty Images)

The Office Is Closed - Federal employees, who've already been forced to take unpaid furlough days thanks to the sequester, will once again be ordered on leave without pay. The good news is they will more than likely be paid retroactively when the government reopens its doors.  (Photo: Eva Russo for The Washington Post)

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The Office Is Closed - Federal employees, who've already been forced to take unpaid furlough days thanks to the sequester, will once again be ordered on leave without pay. The good news is they will more than likely be paid retroactively when the government reopens its doors. (Photo: Eva Russo for The Washington Post)

Newly Retired? - You've been waiting for years for the day when you could kick back and enjoy the fruits of your labor. You may be waiting for that Social Security check if you're a new claimant.(Photo: William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)

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Newly Retired? - You've been waiting for years for the day when you could kick back and enjoy the fruits of your labor. You may be waiting for that Social Security check if you're a new claimant.(Photo: William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)

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Protect, But Not Get Paid - "All military personnel will continue to serve and accrue pay but will not actually be paid until appropriations are available," Rep. C.W. Young (R-Florida) told the Air Force Times. (Photo: John Moore/Getty Images)

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No Loan for You - Federal loans for small business owners or expectant homeowners will not be processed. (Photo: GettyImages)

Medical Research Halts - The National Institutes of Health will not take on any new patents or begin new clinical trials.  (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Medical Research Halts - The National Institutes of Health will not take on any new patents or begin new clinical trials. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Compost Heap - Because Washington's budget is controlled by Congress, street sweeping and trash collection in the nation's capital could be suspended. During the last threat of a government shutdown in 2011, some residents created a campaign to retaliate by dumping their garbage in House Speaker John Boehner's front yard.  (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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D.C. Compost Heap - Because Washington's budget is controlled by Congress, street sweeping and trash collection in the nation's capital could be suspended. During the last threat of a government shutdown in 2011, some residents created a campaign to retaliate by dumping their garbage in House Speaker John Boehner's front yard. (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)