In Their Own Words: #Katrina10Years

Quotes from the BET News special on Hurricane Katrina.

Words From the Bayou - A look at memorable quotes from remarkable residents of New Orleans and surrounding cities from the BET News special Katrina 10 Years Later: Through Hell in High Water.  (Photo: BET)

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Words From the Bayou - A look at memorable quotes from remarkable residents of New Orleans and surrounding cities from the BET News special Katrina 10 Years Later: Through Hell in High Water. (Photo: BET)

Robert Green - "We live through hurricanes. We know how to deal with them. We respect them. But we had no idea to know that we would have rising water, 25 feet of water in 12 minutes," Robert Green said. "My house was actually lifted off the foundation and broke away from the back of the house and became a boat with a hole in it."(Photo: BET) 

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Robert Green - "We live through hurricanes. We know how to deal with them. We respect them. But we had no idea to know that we would have rising water, 25 feet of water in 12 minutes," Robert Green said. "My house was actually lifted off the foundation and broke away from the back of the house and became a boat with a hole in it."(Photo: BET) 

Charles Allen - "There really is a new New Orleans. And thankfully so," community organizer Charles Allen said. "Thankfully this community wasn't just snuffed out. Because culturally, for the rest of the country and the world, we contribute a lot."  (Photo: BET) 

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Charles Allen - "There really is a new New Orleans. And thankfully so," community organizer Charles Allen said. "Thankfully this community wasn't just snuffed out. Because culturally, for the rest of the country and the world, we contribute a lot." (Photo: BET) 

Brandan 'B. Mike' Odums - "New Orleans is a place where the beauty of the city is if you give us bad we are going to figure out how to make good of it," said visual artist Brandan "B. Mike" Odums. "I think that's one of the most beautiful things about this city is that we're still here." (Photo: BET) 

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Brandan 'B. Mike' Odums - "New Orleans is a place where the beauty of the city is if you give us bad we are going to figure out how to make good of it," said visual artist Brandan "B. Mike" Odums. "I think that's one of the most beautiful things about this city is that we're still here." (Photo: BET) 

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu - "When Katrina hit, you know the world gasped at the possibility of losing this cultural gem that we call the city," said Mayor Mitch Landrieu. "It helped the people of New Orleans love themselves again."(Photo: BET) 

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New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu - "When Katrina hit, you know the world gasped at the possibility of losing this cultural gem that we call the city," said Mayor Mitch Landrieu. "It helped the people of New Orleans love themselves again."(Photo: BET) 

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Wendell Pierce - "What I'm excited about is the fact that when we thought it wouldn't come back ? that there was no way in those real dark days ? it just shows you the power of people's spirit and their resilience and their determination to come back," said actor Wendell Pierce.  (Photo: BET) 

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Wendell Pierce - "What I'm excited about is the fact that when we thought it wouldn't come back — that there was no way in those real dark days — it just shows you the power of people's spirit and their resilience and their determination to come back," said actor Wendell Pierce. (Photo: BET) 

Walter 'Kango Slimm' Williams - "When we came back, the music had kind of changed. While we were gone and on the road, those people that were here really began their own little legacy of music," said Kango Slimm, a member of New Orleans hip hop, funk and jazz group Partners-N-Crime. "We got our own little musical gumbo here, just like the gumbo your grandma used to cook. She used to just throw everything in there."  (Photo: BET) 

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Walter 'Kango Slimm' Williams - "When we came back, the music had kind of changed. While we were gone and on the road, those people that were here really began their own little legacy of music," said Kango Slimm, a member of New Orleans hip hop, funk and jazz group Partners-N-Crime. "We got our own little musical gumbo here, just like the gumbo your grandma used to cook. She used to just throw everything in there." (Photo: BET) 

Michael 'Mr. Meana' Patterson - "What makes New Orleans music different from anywhere else is the dialect," said Michael "Mr. Meana" Patterson, a member of Partners-N-Crime. "Everything is short, and we put that in the music and people fall in love with the dialect of how we come across."  (Photo: BET) 

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Michael 'Mr. Meana' Patterson - "What makes New Orleans music different from anywhere else is the dialect," said Michael "Mr. Meana" Patterson, a member of Partners-N-Crime. "Everything is short, and we put that in the music and people fall in love with the dialect of how we come across." (Photo: BET) 

Doris Hicks - "The future looks bright. I think our kids are going to go just as far as they can go," said Doris Hicks, CEO/Principal of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology. "If they do that, our mission will be accomplished."  (Photo: BET) 

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Doris Hicks - "The future looks bright. I think our kids are going to go just as far as they can go," said Doris Hicks, CEO/Principal of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology. "If they do that, our mission will be accomplished." (Photo: BET) 

Lindsey Moore - "All of our students have been accepted into a college," said Lindsey Moore, high school principal of Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School. "You just don't know what it is to see them progress when everything was against them. I can't explain it."  (Photo: BET)

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Lindsey Moore - "All of our students have been accepted into a college," said Lindsey Moore, high school principal of Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School. "You just don't know what it is to see them progress when everything was against them. I can't explain it." (Photo: BET)

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Wayne Baquet Sr. - "Food is so important in New Orleans," said Wayne Baquet Sr., owner of Lil Dizzy's restaurant. "It's almost like religion."  (Photo: BET) 

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Wayne Baquet Sr. - "Food is so important in New Orleans," said Wayne Baquet Sr., owner of Lil Dizzy's restaurant. "It's almost like religion." (Photo: BET) 

Karen Parker - "Biloxi has changed because of Katrina," said Karen Parker, who lost her home during the storm and lived in tents, cars and trailers until a non-profit organization bought her a home. "It's still Biloxi. It's just not old Biloxi."  (Photo: BET) 

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Karen Parker - "Biloxi has changed because of Katrina," said Karen Parker, who lost her home during the storm and lived in tents, cars and trailers until a non-profit organization bought her a home. "It's still Biloxi. It's just not old Biloxi." (Photo: BET) 

Patrice Parker - "My mom is a strong woman," said Patrice Parker, whose family lives in Biloxi, Miss., and lost their home during the storm. "That's my rock right there."  (Photo: BET) 

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Patrice Parker - "My mom is a strong woman," said Patrice Parker, whose family lives in Biloxi, Miss., and lost their home during the storm. "That's my rock right there." (Photo: BET) 

Chrissy Purcell - "The idea was getting young people to realize growing food isn't something to look down on," said Chrissy Purcell, founder of Grow Dat Youth Farm. "At the end of the day we all need to eat to survive. We all want good, clean, fair food." (Photo: BET) 

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Chrissy Purcell - "The idea was getting young people to realize growing food isn't something to look down on," said Chrissy Purcell, founder of Grow Dat Youth Farm. "At the end of the day we all need to eat to survive. We all want good, clean, fair food." (Photo: BET)