Same-Sex Marriage Around the U.S.

Gay marriage became legal in 11 more states this week.

2009 Law - The Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act of 2009 provides funding and technical assistance to state, local and tribal jurisdictions to help them investigate and prosecute hate crimes to the fullest extent, including crimes directed at the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community. The law was the first significant expansion of federal criminal civil rights law since the mid-1990s.   (Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

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An Evolving Issue - On Oct. 6, 2014, the Supreme Court justices refused to rule on same-sex marriage cases, essentially legalizing the unions in 11 states, including politically red regions. Experts say this landmark decision might soon make same-sex marriage legal in 30 states. Keep reading for a look at how the marriage equality movement has evolved in recent years. — Britt Middleton, Patrice Peck and Dominique Zonyéé (Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Virginia - Gay couples began marrying in Virginia on Oct. 6. Lindsey Oliver and Nicole Pries celebrated their three-year anniversary of their commitment ceremony by becoming the first same-sex couple to receive a marriage license issued from the Richmond Circuit Court Clerk?s office.(Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

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Virginia - Gay couples began marrying in Virginia on Oct. 6. Lindsey Oliver and Nicole Pries celebrated their three-year anniversary of their commitment ceremony by becoming the first same-sex couple to receive a marriage license issued from the Richmond Circuit Court Clerk’s office.(Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Oklahoma - A federal appeals court overturned a legal challenge to the state?s ban on same-sex marriage earlier this year. On Oct. 6, gay couples in Oklahoma were issued marriage licenses in several counties following a landmark Supreme Court decision.(Photo: Nick Oxford/Landov)

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Oklahoma - A federal appeals court overturned a legal challenge to the state’s ban on same-sex marriage earlier this year. On Oct. 6, gay couples in Oklahoma were issued marriage licenses in several counties following a landmark Supreme Court decision.(Photo: Nick Oxford/Landov)

Colorado - Colorado began allowing gay marriages on Oct. 7, with the state?s highest court clearing the way. ?There are no remaining legal requirements that prevent same-sex couples from legally marrying in Colorado,? said Colorado Attorney General John Suthers in a statement.(Photo: RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

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Colorado - Colorado began allowing gay marriages on Oct. 7, with the state’s highest court clearing the way. “There are no remaining legal requirements that prevent same-sex couples from legally marrying in Colorado,” said Colorado Attorney General John Suthers in a statement.(Photo: RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

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West Virginia - As of Oct. 6, West Virginia is one of several states in the 4th Circuit that is legally required to overturn their states’ marriage bans. "In light of the U.S. Supreme Court's surprising decision to not review this matter, we are analyzing the implications for the West Virginia case,” said a spokeswoman for Attorney General Patrick Morrissey.(Photo: Andre Kosters/Landov)

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Kansas - Although the Supreme Court cleared the way for gay marriages in Kansas on Oct. 6, some gay couples who applied for marriage licenses that day were still rejected. "An overwhelming majority of Kansas voters amended the Constitution to include a definition of marriage as one man and one woman. Activist judges should not overrule the people of Kansas,? Gov. Sam Brownback said in a statement.(Photo: Vivian Mosier/Splash/ /Splash News/Corbis)

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Kansas - Although the Supreme Court cleared the way for gay marriages in Kansas on Oct. 6, some gay couples who applied for marriage licenses that day were still rejected. "An overwhelming majority of Kansas voters amended the Constitution to include a definition of marriage as one man and one woman. Activist judges should not overrule the people of Kansas,” Gov. Sam Brownback said in a statement.(Photo: Vivian Mosier/Splash/ /Splash News/Corbis)

North Carolina - The southern state?s current ban effectively became unconstitutional on Oct. 6 after the Supreme Court refused to interfere. Although the local American Civil Liberties Union said it would file a request to have a federal judge overturn the law, marriage equality is expected to arrive in North Carolina very soon, experts predict.(Photo: Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)

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North Carolina - The southern state’s current ban effectively became unconstitutional on Oct. 6 after the Supreme Court refused to interfere. Although the local American Civil Liberties Union said it would file a request to have a federal judge overturn the law, marriage equality is expected to arrive in North Carolina very soon, experts predict.(Photo: Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)

South Carolina - Like its neighbor North Carolina, South Carolina is also constitutionally required to allow gay marriages effective Oct. 6. But South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson said he will continue to fight to enforce the state constitution?s ban, AP reports.(Photo: John Moore/Getty Images)

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South Carolina - Like its neighbor North Carolina, South Carolina is also constitutionally required to allow gay marriages effective Oct. 6. But South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson said he will continue to fight to enforce the state constitution’s ban, AP reports.(Photo: John Moore/Getty Images)

Zoraida ?Ale? Reyes - The body of Zoraida ?Ale? Reyes was found behind a Dairy Queen in Anaheim, Calif., on June 12. Although there were no immediate signs of foul play, police arrested Randy Lee Parkerson, 38, four months later in connection with the 28-year-old's suspicious death. Hate-crime charges were not pursued. "For many the lives of transgender people don't matter and they're viewed as disposable," Jorge Gutierrez, a friend of Reyes, told the Los Angeles Times. "We know that her identity as a trans woman was a huge factor, whether the police want to acknowledge it or not." Parkerson was reportedly being held on $1 million bail.(Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images)

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Idaho - On Oct. 7, federal courts struck down gay marriage bans in Idaho and Nevada because they “violate same-sex couples’ equal protection rights."(Photo: Robert Alexander/Getty Images)

Nevada - "Idaho and Nevada's marriage laws, by preventing same-sex couples from marrying and refusing to recognize same-sex marriages celebrated elsewhere, impose profound legal, financial, social and psychic harms on numerous citizens of those states,? Judge Stephen Reinhardt wrote. The three-judge panel was unanimous.(Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Nevada - "Idaho and Nevada's marriage laws, by preventing same-sex couples from marrying and refusing to recognize same-sex marriages celebrated elsewhere, impose profound legal, financial, social and psychic harms on numerous citizens of those states,” Judge Stephen Reinhardt wrote. The three-judge panel was unanimous.(Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Wisconsin - Days after a federal judge struck down Wisconsin?s ban on same-sex marriages on Friday, June 6, hundreds of couples married in Milwaukee and Madison. The new judgment prompted court officials to perform ceremonies as early as 5 p.m. on Friday, but according to Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen, marriage licenses were awarded prematurely. Van Hollen asked the federal 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago on Monday, June 9, to discontinue issuing licenses. On Oct. 6, 2014, gay marriage became effectively legal in the Midwestern state thanks to a sweeping decision by the Supreme Court justices.(Photo: AP Photo/Wisconsin State Journal, Amber Arnold)

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Wisconsin - Days after a federal judge struck down Wisconsin’s ban on same-sex marriages on Friday, June 6, hundreds of couples married in Milwaukee and Madison. The new judgment prompted court officials to perform ceremonies as early as 5 p.m. on Friday, but according to Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen, marriage licenses were awarded prematurely. Van Hollen asked the federal 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago on Monday, June 9, to discontinue issuing licenses. On Oct. 6, 2014, gay marriage became effectively legal in the Midwestern state thanks to a sweeping decision by the Supreme Court justices.(Photo: AP Photo/Wisconsin State Journal, Amber Arnold)

Utah - After a Utah judge struck down the state's ban on same-sex marriage on Dec. 20, 2013, prompting more than 900 same-sex couples to tie the knot, the U.S. Supreme Court put the ruling on hold on Jan. 6. Gov. Gary Herbert instructed state agencies to recognize gay marriages on Oct. 6 after the Supreme Court effectively legalized the union. Three gay couples who sued over Utah?s ban exchanged kisses and cried at a news conference, AP reports.(Photo: Rick Bowmer/AP Photo)

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Utah - After a Utah judge struck down the state's ban on same-sex marriage on Dec. 20, 2013, prompting more than 900 same-sex couples to tie the knot, the U.S. Supreme Court put the ruling on hold on Jan. 6. Gov. Gary Herbert instructed state agencies to recognize gay marriages on Oct. 6 after the Supreme Court effectively legalized the union. Three gay couples who sued over Utah’s ban exchanged kisses and cried at a news conference, AP reports.(Photo: Rick Bowmer/AP Photo)

Oregon - U.S. District Judge Michael McShane ruled on May 19 that Oregon?s same-sex marriage ban approved by voters in 2004 is unconstitutional. "I believe that if we can look for a moment past gender and sexuality, we can see in these plaintiffs nothing more or less than our own families, families who we would expect our Constitution to protect, if not exalt, in equal measure," McShane said.(Photo: AP Photo/Steve Dykes)

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Oregon - U.S. District Judge Michael McShane ruled on May 19 that Oregon’s same-sex marriage ban approved by voters in 2004 is unconstitutional. "I believe that if we can look for a moment past gender and sexuality, we can see in these plaintiffs nothing more or less than our own families, families who we would expect our Constitution to protect, if not exalt, in equal measure," McShane said.(Photo: AP Photo/Steve Dykes)

Arkansas - Only a week after Pulaski County Circuit Judge Chris Piazza struck down Arkansas 10-year ban on gay marriage on May 9, a political back-and-forth resulted in the state's Supreme Court halting any more same-sex marriages in the state. Consequently, the legality of the marriage licenses of more than 400 gay and lesbian couples remain in limbo.(Photo: REUTERS/Jacob Slaton)

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Arkansas - Only a week after Pulaski County Circuit Judge Chris Piazza struck down Arkansas 10-year ban on gay marriage on May 9, a political back-and-forth resulted in the state's Supreme Court halting any more same-sex marriages in the state. Consequently, the legality of the marriage licenses of more than 400 gay and lesbian couples remain in limbo.(Photo: REUTERS/Jacob Slaton)

New Mexico - In a unanimous decision Dec. 19, the Supreme Court of New Mexico ruled that it is illegal to deny marriage licenses to gay couples. New Mexico is the first state in the American-Southwest to legalize same-sex marriage.(Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

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New Mexico - In a unanimous decision Dec. 19, the Supreme Court of New Mexico ruled that it is illegal to deny marriage licenses to gay couples. New Mexico is the first state in the American-Southwest to legalize same-sex marriage.(Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

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No. 15 - Both houses of the Illinois General Assembly have now approved the Religious Freedom and Marriage Fairness Act. That makes it the 15th state to approve same-sex marriage. In a statement, Obama said, "Michelle and I are overjoyed for all the committed couples in Illinois whose love will now be as legal as ours." (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Illinois - Gov. Pat Quinn, a long time supporter of same-sex marriage, followed through on his word and signed a measure making Illinois the 16th state to legalize gay marriage on Nov. 20. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Wyoming - AP reports that same-sex marriage could be legal in Wyoming by the end of the year. (Photo: Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)

Gay Marriage - Capping decades of activism, the gay-rights movement won a monumental victory in June in the form of two Supreme Court decisions. One cleared the way for ending a ban on same-sex marriages in California, the most populous state. The other struck down a 1996 law passed by Congress that banned federal recognition of same-sex marriages. In subsequent months, Hawaii, Illinois and New Mexico boosted the number of states allowing gay marriage to 17.(Photo: AP Photo/Oskar Garcia)

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Hawaii - The Hawaii Senate passed the bill 19-4 on Nov. 12, making Hawaii the 15th state to legalize same-sex marriage. The law is set to take affect on June 1, 2014. "With today's vote, Hawaii joins a growing number of states that recognize that our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters should be treated fairly and equally under the law," Hawaii native President Obama said in a statement.(Photo: AP Photo/Oskar Garcia)

New Jersey - After a court determined his appeal was not likely to prevail, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie withdrew his challenge on same-sex marriage on Oct. 21, 2013. New Jersey became the 14th state to acknowledge gay marriage.(Photo: Kena Betancur/Getty Images)

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New Jersey - After a court determined his appeal was not likely to prevail, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie withdrew his challenge on same-sex marriage on Oct. 21, 2013. New Jersey became the 14th state to acknowledge gay marriage.(Photo: Kena Betancur/Getty Images)

Challenges Ahead - Most recently, North Carolina joined 30 other states to amend their constitutions to ban same-sex marriage. (Photo: Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)

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Minnesota - On May 14, Minnesota officially became the 12th U.S. state to approve same-sex marriage. The law takes effect Aug. 1. (Photo: Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)

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Delaware - On May 7, Delaware became the 11th state to legalize gay marriage. The statue went into affect on July 1 with U.S. State Senator Karen Peterson and her partner being the first gay couple to convert their existing civil union into a a marriage in Delaware.(Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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Delaware - On May 7, Delaware became the 11th state to legalize gay marriage. The statue went into affect on July 1 with U.S. State Senator Karen Peterson and her partner being the first gay couple to convert their existing civil union into a a marriage in Delaware.(Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Family Matters - U.S. citizens will not be able to sponsor adult siblings or their adult married children who are 31 or older. In addition, lawfully permanent citizens will not be able to petition for green cards for same-sex spouses.  (Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

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Rhode Island - Just days before Delaware, the Rhode Island state legislature passed a bill giving same-sex couples the right to wed. "I know you have loved ones that dreamed this would happen but did not live to see it. But I am proud to say that now at long last, you are free to marry the person you love," said Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee at a bill-signing ceremony on May 2. (Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Maine - Nov. 6, 2012, was considered a victory for gay marriage advocates in Maine, which became one of the first states to legalize gay marriage by popular vote on a ballot measure. (Photo: Bob Falcetti/Getty Images)

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Maine - Nov. 6, 2012, was considered a victory for gay marriage advocates in Maine, which became one of the first states to legalize gay marriage by popular vote on a ballot measure. (Photo: Bob Falcetti/Getty Images)

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Maryland - Maryland voters also approved same-sex marriage on Nov. 6, 2012. Same-sex couples have been allowed to marry since Jan. 1.  (Photo: UPI/Alexis C. Glenn /Landov)

Washington - Rounding out Election Night on Nov. 6, 2012, was Washington state, where voters approved a referendum supporting same-sex marriage. Couples were allowed to wed beginning Dec. 9, 2012. (Photo: REUTERS/Cliff Despeaux)

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Washington - Rounding out Election Night on Nov. 6, 2012, was Washington state, where voters approved a referendum supporting same-sex marriage. Couples were allowed to wed beginning Dec. 9, 2012. (Photo: REUTERS/Cliff Despeaux)

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New York - After the state legislature passed a bill supporting gay marriage signed into law by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, same-sex couples were allowed to wed in the state beginning July 25, 2011. (Photo: USA-GAYMARRIAGE/ REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

Iowa - In the court case Varnum v. Brien, the Iowa Supreme Court voted unanimously to uphold gay marriage on April 3, 2009. Gay couples were allowed to marry beginning April 27, 2009. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Iowa - In the court case Varnum v. Brien, the Iowa Supreme Court voted unanimously to uphold gay marriage on April 3, 2009. Gay couples were allowed to marry beginning April 27, 2009. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Connecticut - On Oct. 10, 2008, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled to uphold gay marriage. A bill formally legalizing same-sex unions was signed into law in April 2009. (Photo: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

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Connecticut - On Oct. 10, 2008, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled to uphold gay marriage. A bill formally legalizing same-sex unions was signed into law in April 2009. (Photo: REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

Washington, D.C. - Washington, D.C., Mayor Adrian Fenty approved a gay marriage bill on December 18, 2009, with couples being granted the right to apply for marriage licenses starting on March 3, 2010. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

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Washington, D.C. - Washington, D.C., Mayor Adrian Fenty approved a gay marriage bill on December 18, 2009, with couples being granted the right to apply for marriage licenses starting on March 3, 2010. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

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New Hampshire - In June 2009, New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch signed a bill legalizing gay marriage. The following year, a bill aimed at repealing gay marriage was passed in the House Judiciary Committee; it would be defeated in a bipartisan vote by lawmakers on March 21, 2012. (Photo: AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

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Two: Review the Use of Stand Your Ground Laws - I think it would be useful for us to examine some state and local laws to see if it ? if they are designed in such a way that they may encourage the kinds of altercations and confrontations and tragedies that we saw in the Florida case, rather than diffuse potential altercations. (Photo: Jordan Silverman/Getty Images)

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Vermont - After a first attempt was vetoed by Gov. Jim Douglas in 2009, the Vermont lawmakers achieved two-thirds majority support in the Senate and House to override Douglas' veto on April 7, 2009.  Same-sex couples were formally allowed to wed beginning September 1, 2009. (Photo: Jordan Silverman/Getty Images)

Massachusetts - After gay marriage was upheld by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in November 2003, the first marriage licenses in Massachusetts were issued on May 17, 2004. Additionally, in July 2008, the state legislature extended the right for same-sex couples from outside of Massachusetts to wed in the state. (Photo: David Ryder/Getty Images)

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Massachusetts - After gay marriage was upheld by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court in November 2003, the first marriage licenses in Massachusetts were issued on May 17, 2004. Additionally, in July 2008, the state legislature extended the right for same-sex couples from outside of Massachusetts to wed in the state. (Photo: David Ryder/Getty Images)