The 411 on Teen Pregnancy

Learn more about what helps to reduce these rates.

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Get the Facts! - May is National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month. Learn more about teen pregnancy stats, how it impacts African-Americans and what helps reduce these rates. — Kellee Terrell (Photo: Chicago Tribune/MCT /Landov)

Teen Pregnancy in the U.S. - While teen pregnancy is an ongoing issue here in the U.S., a 2013 report from the CDC boasts that current rates are the lowest that they have ever been. Not to mention, these rates dropped by 50 percent among Black teens and 40 percent among Latinas. (Photo: David Cooper/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

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Teen Pregnancy in the U.S. - While teen pregnancy is an ongoing issue here in the U.S., a 2013 report from the CDC boasts that current rates are the lowest that they have ever been. Not to mention, these rates dropped by 50 percent among Black teens and 40 percent among Latinas. (Photo: David Cooper/Toronto Star via Getty Images)

But the Bad News? - Even though pregnancy rates are at their lowest, teens of color have the highest rates in the U.S: Almost double those of their white counterparts. Latina teens had the highest rates with 25.5 percent, compared to 21.9 of African-Americans, 17 percent of American Indian/Alaska Natives, 17 percent of whites and 4.1 of Asians.(Photo: Jason Kempin/Getty Images)

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But the Bad News… - Even though pregnancy rates are at their lowest, teens of color have the highest rates in the U.S: Almost double those of their white counterparts. Latina teens had the highest rates with 25.5 percent, compared to 21.9 of African-Americans, 17 percent of American Indian/Alaska Natives, 17 percent of whites and 4.1 of Asians.(Photo: Jason Kempin/Getty Images)

African-American Teens and Abortion Rates - Not all teens that get pregnant decide to carry out their pregnancy. According to a 2013 report, African-American teens have the highest abortion rates in the country, with 41 out of 1,000 Black teens 15-19 getting the procedure.  (Photo: Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)

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African-American Teens and Abortion Rates - Not all teens that get pregnant decide to carry out their pregnancy. According to a 2013 report, African-American teens have the highest abortion rates in the country, with 41 out of 1,000 Black teens 15-19 getting the procedure.  (Photo: Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)

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Babies Having Babies - While most teens mothers are older than 17, stats show that younger teens having sex and babies are on the rise. It’s estimated that 25 percent of teen mothers give birth between the ages of 15 and 17 — barely out of high school. Also, 27 percent of teens who are 15-17 have had sex in the past, while 8 percent are currently sexually active. (Photo: Art Vandalay/Getty Images)

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How Teen Pregnancy Impacts Your Life - Motherhood is a great thing, but only when you are ready for it. Being a teen mom greatly reduces your chance of finishing high school and going to college. Not to mention, being a teen mom significantly increases your chance of working low wage jobs and living in poverty, compared to teens that are not moms. (Photo: Tim Boyle/Getty Images)

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Why You Deserve Sex Ed - A whopping 80 percent of teens surveyed said they hadn’t received any form of sex education. How can you prevent pregnancy and delay sex if you really don’t understand the basics? FYI: Sex ed doesn’t promote sex, it actually delays it.   (Photo: Keith Brofsky/Getty Images)

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Fellas, This Is Your Problem, Too - When it comes to teen pregnancy, it seems as if all of the blame is placed on the girls. But really, the boys have a stake in this, too. Fellas, you control condom use and when you don’t wrap it up, you put you and her at risk. So step up, be responsible and use condoms.(Photo: Image Source/Getty Images)

Get Schooled - Despite the horror stories one often hears about the value of an urban public school education, the latest College Board/National Journal Next America poll finds that African-American and Latino parents feel that their local schools are doing a good job preparing their children for college. Keep reading to see how races view the value of education, the nation's direction and how the president is handling his job.   (Photo: Jon Feingersh/Getty Images)

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African-American Teachers Are Great Role Models - An interesting 2013 study found that the presence of Black teachers in the classroom, especially female teachers, can reduce teen pregnancy. There is something about seeing Black folks in positions of power that somehow inspires Black youth to make better decisions about sex. (Photo: Jon Feingersh/Getty Images)

Used vs. New Textbooks - Students can save hundreds of dollars by purchasing books on Amazon, and for the first three months of registration students are awarded free shipping. Another good source for selling and purchasing text books comes in the form of an app. Students can download Chegg to their iPhone or Android for low cost books.(Photo: Martin Poole/Getty Images)

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Reading Can Prevent Teen Pregnancy? - A 2012 study found that Black female students that read more and got better grades were more likely to delay sex and not get pregnant. Girls with lower literacy skills are 2.5 times more likely to give birth during high school. (Photo: Martin Poole/Getty Images)

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Condom - Condoms are one of the most popular birth control methods out there. They are typically inexpensive and require little planning, and as the ultimate barrier method, they also protect you from STI better than anything short of abstinence. There are female and male versions, made of everything from latex to lambskin.  Effectiveness: 98% when used perfectly (Photo: Mac99/Getty Images)

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Why Is Birth Control So Expensive? - In a survey cited on The Huffington Post, 51 percent of African-American women aged 18 to 34 reported having trouble purchasing and consistently using birth control due to its high cost. Including it in preventive care and getting it covered with no co-pay can strengthen our access and keep more money in our pockets. (Photo: Mac99/Getty Images)

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Pregnancy Shouldn’t Be Your Only Worry - Pregnancy is not the only consequence of unprotected sex — there are HIV and STDs to worry about, too. So think about doubling up on your contraception — using birth control and condoms — to protect your reproductive health entirely. Each of you should do your part in protecting each other. (Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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It’s OK to Say No - In the end, this is your body and your life. Yes, there is a lot of pressure to have sex, but remember, you don’t have to if you don’t want to. Have sex when you are ready and armed with what you need. (Photo: Rolf Bruderer via Blend Images LLC/Getty Images)