Health Rewind: Michelle Williams on Depression

Depression, childhood obesity, and more health news.

Michelle Williams: July 23 - The former Destiny's Child member turns 32.   (Photo: Jason Merritt/Getty Images For BET)

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Michelle Williams on Battling Depression - In a recent interview with Rolling Out magazine, singer Michelle Williams talked about her battle with depression. She stated that her public disclosure happened on accident, but she’s glad it happened. “[So] many people are reaching out to me and saying ‘Thank you.’ They’ve been going through the same thing and didn’t know what to do.”(Photo: Jason Merritt/Getty Images For BET)

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Are Chemicals Helping Make Black Kids Fat? - African-American kids who use lotions and shampoos with high levels of phthalates — a chemical in plastic — are more likely to be obese, says a new study. Researchers from New York University found that Black children’s bodies contained more phthalates than other kids and they were 22 percent more likely to be obese than white kids, reported Environment Health News.  (Photo: John Moore/Getty Images)

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What’s Really in Your Energy Drink? - The past few month energy drinks have been in the spotlight — and not in a good way. A new report highlights what these drinks are made up of and the health dangers they may pose. The excessive amount of caffeine, ginseng and additives, along with being added to alcohol and antidepressants, is worrisome, reported Time.com.  (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Philly Hospital Teaches Youth About Gun Violence - In the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre and Philadelphia’s own gun violence problem, Temple University Hospital is teaching young people the reality of gun violence, reported the New York Times. Cradle to Grave de-glamorizes guns and emphasizes that “settling scores” and engaging in gang activity can ruin their lives.(Photo: REUTERS/ Michelle McLoughlin)

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Philly Hospital Teaches Youth About Gun Violence - In the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre and Philadelphia’s own gun violence problem, Temple University Hospital is teaching young people the reality of gun violence, reported the New York Times. Cradle to Grave de-glamorizes guns and emphasizes that “settling scores” and engaging in gang activity can ruin their lives.(Photo: REUTERS/ Michelle McLoughlin)

Don’t Rub Your Eyes  - This can be especially tricky during allergy season, but rubbing your eyes can cause wrinkles and break the teeny capillaries just under the skin, which results in dark circles. Hands off: Lack of sleep can lead to dryness, and if your eyes are itchy, OTC antihistamine eye drops might help.  (Photo: Geri Lavrov / Getty Images)

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Are Young People the Most Stressed? - Young people ages 18-33 are extremely stressed, and it isn’t getting better, a new report says. Thirty-nine percent of young people claim in the past year that their stress has gotten worse; 53 percent say their stress interferes with their sleep and young people have been diagnosed with depression or anxiety more than any other age group, reported USA Today.(Photo: Getty Images/STOCK)

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Obama Administration Revises Contraception Mandate - President Obama revised a controversial mandate that would require religious organizations to pay for birth control for their employees, reported Medscape. His new proposal would require that insurance companies pay for contraception, instead of the religious institutions, who claimed that being forced to pay for birth control goes against their faith.  (Photo Illustration: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

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African-Americans Less Likely to Receive Kidney Transplants - Researchers from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine found that kidney patients who are African-American were 56 percent less likely to receive transplants compared to whites. Researchers also found that patients with private insurance as opposed to having no health care or being on Medicaid were three times more likely to receive a transplant, Reuters wrote. (Photo: Commercial Appeal /Landov)

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World Cancer Day: Dispelling Myths - For World Cancer Day, which is Feb. 4, a feature in USA Today help raise awareness around the disease by addressing the role that pollution, obesity and sedentary lifestyles play in the rise of cancer diagnoses. The article also emphasizes that cancer is more than a health issue: It’s also a social, economic and human rights concern. (Photo: Essdras M Suarez/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

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Banning Chips and Soda From School Vending Machines? - To help address the growing childhood obesity crisis, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is proposing that soda, candy and chips be taken out of vending machines in schools. This new proposal calls for all snacks offered during school to be “either fruit, vegetables, dairy products, protein-rich foods, or whole-grain products as their main ingredients,” says HealthDay News.(Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

GE and NFL Join Forces to Address Head Injuries - General Electric and the NFL will launch a $4 to $50 million dollar project to develop technology that will screen for concussions and create better protective gear and materials for players, reported the New York Times. Over the years, there has been growing concern that concussions and head trauma has led to a rise in suicides and dementia among retired NFL players.(Photo: Alex Trautwig/Getty Images)

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GE and NFL Join Forces to Address Head Injuries - General Electric and the NFL will launch a $4 to $50 million dollar project to develop technology that will screen for concussions and create better protective gear and materials for players, reported the New York Times. Over the years, there has been growing concern that concussions and head trauma has led to a rise in suicides and dementia among retired NFL players.(Photo: Alex Trautwig/Getty Images)