Press Reset: Artists Who've Changed the Message in Their Music

Some things just can't remain the same.

Press Reset: Artists Who've Changed the Message in Their Music - We can't expect artists to always stay the same. Just like all other people, as they grow and experience new things, their music will likely change, too. Some, though, make bigger turns than others, creating cuts whose content would have seemed in many ways unimaginable earlier in their careers. Read on for a look at music stars who've exhibited particularly noticeable shifts.(Photos from left: Ian Gavan/Getty Images, Larry Busacca/Getty Images, Bennett Raglin/BET/Getty Images for BET)

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Press Reset: Artists Who've Changed the Message in Their Music - We can't expect artists to always stay the same. Just like all other people, as they grow and experience new things, their music will likely change, too. Some, though, make bigger turns than others, creating cuts whose content would have seemed in many ways unimaginable earlier in their careers. Read on for a look at music stars who've exhibited particularly noticeable shifts.(Photos from left: Ian Gavan/Getty Images, Larry Busacca/Getty Images, Bennett Raglin/BET/Getty Images for BET)

Beyoncé - Beyoncé has been making hits for more than a decade and a half. It's no surprise, then, that her topics have switched up a bit over that span. Though she surely has the "Independent Woman Part I" of yesteryear still in her and continues to explore feminist themes, her recent work, particularly last year's self-titled album, has gotten more explicit and much more personal. (Photo: Buda Mendes/Getty Images)

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Beyoncé - Beyoncé has been making hits for more than a decade and a half. It's no surprise, then, that her topics have switched up a bit over that span. Though she surely has the "Independent Woman Part I" of yesteryear still in her and continues to explore feminist themes, her recent work, particularly last year's self-titled album, has gotten more explicit and much more personal. (Photo: Buda Mendes/Getty Images)

Snoop Dogg - Snoop's been around for more than 20 years and he's evolved in that span. What started as purely gangsta raps gave way to hit singles for the ladies and, more recently, a change in both style of music and content, as he morphed into Snoop Lion to create reggae jams — songs like "No Guns Allowed." (Photo: WENN.com)

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Snoop Dogg - Snoop's been around for more than 20 years and he's evolved in that span. What started as purely gangsta raps gave way to hit singles for the ladies and, more recently, a change in both style of music and content, as he morphed into Snoop Lion to create reggae jams — songs like "No Guns Allowed." (Photo: WENN.com)

Dave Hollister - After initially making his mark as a vocalist for Blackstreet, Dave Hollister and his music took a bit of a turn when he branched out solo and began preaching and making gospel music with albums like The Book of David: Vol. 1 The Transition.(Photo: Chad Buchanan/Getty Images for LMVH)

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Dave Hollister - After initially making his mark as a vocalist for Blackstreet, Dave Hollister and his music took a bit of a turn when he branched out solo and began preaching and making gospel music with albums like The Book of David: Vol. 1 The Transition.(Photo: Chad Buchanan/Getty Images for LMVH)

Buju Banton - Early in his career, Buju Banton became widely known for "Boom Bye Bye," an anti-gay song that advocated violence. However, as his career progressed, some of his ideas did, as well. For instance, in 2003 he dropped "Mr. Nine," which was an anti-gun song. (Photo: Scott Eells/Getty Images)

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Buju Banton - Early in his career, Buju Banton became widely known for "Boom Bye Bye," an anti-gay song that advocated violence. However, as his career progressed, some of his ideas did, as well. For instance, in 2003 he dropped "Mr. Nine," which was an anti-gun song. (Photo: Scott Eells/Getty Images)

No Malice - Back when he was known as Malice, this MC was one half of the Clipse and spewing raps that didn't hold back on themes of drug dealing and violence. Though he's always been religious, No Malice found a new relationship with God in recent years, and has changed both his name and the content of his rhymes.(Photo: Bennett Raglin/BET/Getty Images for BET)

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No Malice - Back when he was known as Malice, this MC was one half of the Clipse and spewing raps that didn't hold back on themes of drug dealing and violence. Though he's always been religious, No Malice found a new relationship with God in recent years, and has changed both his name and the content of his rhymes.(Photo: Bennett Raglin/BET/Getty Images for BET)

Wale vs. Complex - Wale is known for his poetic flow, and hot head; and as a result, the D.C. rapper has had his fair share of beef. So when the "Bad" rapper took to Twitter to fire off at Complex magazine, it wasn't a surprise. Complex magazine editors failed to add The Gifted to its 50 Best Albums of 2013 list, and the ever-passionate Wale took it personally. He called the Complex staff threatening to "knock out" folks, prompting Complex to release the audio of Folarin's rant. Twitter went crazy taking sides.(Photo: Gary Miller/FilmMagic)

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Wale - While he himself will be quick to dismiss any claims that the content of his music has changed, Wale was making anthems that uplifted women, not ones that celebrated strip clubs, early in his career. Though he's still doing the former, he's now also doing the latter. (Photo: Gary Miller/FilmMagic)

Everlast - After shooting up the charts as a member of House of Pain with the raucous "Jump Around," Everlast toned things down a bit when he went solo. His biggest hit, "What It's Like," is a soft-rock/bluesy fusion that preaches understanding.(Photo: Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images) 

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Everlast - After shooting up the charts as a member of House of Pain with the raucous "Jump Around," Everlast toned things down a bit when he went solo. His biggest hit, "What It's Like," is a soft-rock/bluesy fusion that preaches understanding.(Photo: Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images) 

Coko - Songstresses Coko and Chanté Moore rose to popularity in the '90s. In recent years, their respective reality shows have allowed them to reconnect with their adoring fans. (Photo: JLN Photography/WENN.com)

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Coko - After kicking off her career as a member of the R&B group SWV, famous for the super seductive hit "Downtown," Coko stepped out on her own and began creating gospel records like Grateful. (Photo: JLN Photography/WENN.com)

Rihanna - After emerging as a teenager with dance hits like "Pon De Replay" and "S.O.S.," Rihanna has flipped her reputation from a pop princess to bad gal. In addition to her blunt-smoking, strip club-loving antics, she's been up front about this change in her music, releasing albums like Good Girl Gone Bad, Rated R, and Unapologetic. (Photo: Mike Lawrie/Getty Images)

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Rihanna - After emerging as a teenager with dance hits like "Pon De Replay" and "S.O.S.," Rihanna has flipped her reputation from a pop princess to bad gal. In addition to her blunt-smoking, strip club-loving antics, she's been up front about this change in her music, releasing albums like Good Girl Gone Bad, Rated R, and Unapologetic. (Photo: Mike Lawrie/Getty Images)

Lupe Fiasco - When Lupe Fiasco was a teenager, he was in a group called "Da Park," which recorded music filled with typical gangsta rap themes like drugs and violence. Though they were signed to Epic, the Chicago MC left the group to go solo and craft rhymes with a different point of view. In the years since, he's still focused on drugs and guns; rather than glorifying them, though, he raps about how they hurt Black communities. (Photo: Michael Kovac/WireImage)

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Lupe Fiasco - When Lupe Fiasco was a teenager, he was in a group called "Da Park," which recorded music filled with typical gangsta rap themes like drugs and violence. Though they were signed to Epic, the Chicago MC left the group to go solo and craft rhymes with a different point of view. In the years since, he's still focused on drugs and guns; rather than glorifying them, though, he raps about how they hurt Black communities. (Photo: Michael Kovac/WireImage)