Teen Dating Violence: What You Need to Know

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month.

Recognize the Double Standard - Think of the some of the worst things that you have said to yourself. If someone else, such as a boyfriend, friend or parent, were to say that exact same thing to you, you would think it was cruel and abusive. So when you do it, why is it OK?  (Photo: Troels Graugaard/Getty Images)

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When Love Hurts - February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness month. Teen dating violence is more common than we would like to admit. Almost one in ten teens are in an abusive relationship. Read more about the current statistics, how this issue affects Black youth and warning signs of abuse. —Kellee Terrell(Photo: Troels Graugaard/Getty Images)

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What Is Teen Dating Violence? - Whether it’s referred to as intimate partner violence, domestic violence or dating violence, it can be described as physical, sexual or psychological/emotional violence within a dating relationship. Stalking, whether physical or via the Internet and phone, is also included. Also, violence can happen to both boys and girls, but past studies show that girls report higher rates of dating abuse. (Photo: John Slater/Getty Images)

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General Dating Violence Stats - A 2011 CDC survey found that 9.4 percent all high school students were hit, slapped or hurt physically by their girlfriends or boyfriends. Another report found that about 1 in 5 women and nearly 1 in 7 men who ever experienced rape, physical violence and/or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age.  (Photo: Pablo Alcala/Lexington Herald-Leader/ MCT /LANDOV)

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Blacks and Teen Dating Violence - While teen dating violence happens to all races and ethnicities, African-American high school girls are 80 percent more likely to be hit or attacked by their male partners. However, a 2012 study found that the most common form of abuse among Black teens is verbal and psychological abuse. (Photo: Fuse/Getty Images)

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Dating Violence Top Reason for Teen ER Visits - A 2011 study found that more than half of all teen visits to urban area ERs were due to dating violence. What’s even more disturbing was that researchers found that of the 174 people who admitted to abuse, only four sought help from the resources offered by health care providers within a month of seeking treatment in the ER.(Photo: Image Source/Corbis)

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Teen Dating Cyber Abuse Is Common Among Girls of Color - A 2014 study from the University of Pittsburgh found that 40 percent of the teens surveyed said they had been a victim of cyber abuse in the past three months. Those at risk: Girls of color, bisexual girls and those dating more than one person, CBS.com writes. The most common form of abuse was stalking and making mean comments.(Photo: Larry Williams/Corbis)

More Research Links Racial Oppression and PTSD - Can racism cause post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)? A new Psychology Today article sheds light on the emotional impact that experiencing racial oppression can have. Past data shows that Blacks have higher rates of PTSD compared to whites and we are more likely to have difficulties performing everyday activities and going to work because of it. (Photo: Image Source / Getty Images)

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What Encourages This Type of Violence? - Past data has pointed to many factors. A 2013 study looked at African-American teen girls and found that experiencing and/or witnessing severe sexual and physical trauma at home put women more at risk for entering abusive relationships. Other factors include poverty, victim blaming and a society that undermines women.   (Photo: Image Source / Getty Images)

You?re Feeling Overwhelmed - Your stress, anxiety, inability to concentrate, or sadness is making it hard to complete daily tasks, from writing a report at work to playing with your kids.   (Photo: Photodisc/Getty Images)

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The Consequences of Abuse - Past data shows that dating violence can have long-lasting effects. Those who are abused in their teens are more likely to drop out of school, suffer from depression, binge drink, abuse drugs and have suicidal thoughts compared to those who have not been abused. Also being abused young can make you more likely to be victimized as an adult in future relationships.   (Photo: Photodisc/Getty Images)

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Violence, Coerced Sex and Condoms - Sometimes abuse comes in the form of sexual violence —pressuring partners into sex, rape or forcing partners not to use condoms. This type of violence, especially if the sex is condomless, opens up victims to STDs and HIV infections. Past data has shown that violence plays a factor in HIV infections among Black women. (Photo: Alexander Tamargo/Getty Images for Magnum Condoms)

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Why You Have to Take Violence Seriously - While some of the public response to Chris Brown and Rihanna’s abusive relationship from young people was alarming, it’s important to understand that violence is serious and that victims do not deserve it. Abuse is not a consequence of you doing something wrong. Read more about the dangers and consequences of teen dating violence here.  (Photos from left: Hall/Pena, PacificCoastNews.com, Optic Photos, PacificCoastNews.com)

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Know the Warning Signs - Physical and sexual abuse may be easier to detect, but other common warning signs include: Checking your cell phone or email without permission, constantly putting you down, extreme jealousy or insecurity, explosive temper, isolating you from family or friends, telling you what to do and possessiveness.(Photo: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Dating Violence and the LGBT Community - Dating violence isn?t just a heterosexual problem ? LGBT teens are just as likely to experience dating violence as heterosexual youth. One study found that 14.6 percent of male teens and 26 percent of female teens experienced psychological violence in same sex relationships. Another study found that 43.6 percent and 39.8 had experienced at least one type of abuse from a same-sex partner.  (Photo: Eric Raptosh Photography/Getty Images)

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Dating Violence and the LGBT Community - Dating violence isn’t just a heterosexual problem — LGBT teens are just as likely to experience dating violence as heterosexual youth. One study found that 14.6 percent of male teens and 26 percent of female teens experienced psychological violence in same sex relationships. Another study found that 43.6 percent and 39.8 had experienced at least one type of abuse from a same-sex partner.  (Photo: Eric Raptosh Photography/Getty Images)