Katrina 10 Years Later: Scenes From the Hurricane

A look back at the aftermath of the natural disaster.

The Hurricane That Changed Everything - Upon the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, BET.com takes a look back at scenes from the aftermath of the natural disaster. You can watch BET's news special Katrina 10 Years Later: Through Hell in High Water here.  In this photo, people on Canal Street use a boat to get to higher ground as water began to fill the streets. Thousands of people were left homeless after the hurricane. (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

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The Hurricane That Changed Everything - Upon the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, BET.com takes a look back at scenes from the aftermath of the natural disaster. You can watch BET's news special Katrina 10 Years Later: Through Hell in High Water here. In this photo, people on Canal Street use a boat to get to higher ground as water began to fill the streets. Thousands of people were left homeless after the hurricane. (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

One of the Most Deadly Disasters - Hurricane Katrina was the costliest natural disaster as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States. At least 1,836 people lost their lives in the actual hurricane and in the subsequent floods. (Photo: Universal History Archive/Getty Images)

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One of the Most Deadly Disasters - Hurricane Katrina was the costliest natural disaster as well as one of the five deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States. At least 1,836 people lost their lives in the actual hurricane and in the subsequent floods. (Photo: Universal History Archive/Getty Images)

Thousands Left Stranded - Stranded victims of Hurricane Katrina wait outside the Superdome to be evacuated in New Orleans. Thousands of troops poured into the city Sept. 2 to help with security and delivery of supplies in the wake of the storm. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Thousands Left Stranded - Stranded victims of Hurricane Katrina wait outside the Superdome to be evacuated in New Orleans. Thousands of troops poured into the city Sept. 2 to help with security and delivery of supplies in the wake of the storm. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Shelters Fill Up Before the Storm - The Superdome was used as an emergency shelter, before the arrival of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Katrina killed at least seven when it moved through Miami-Dade County in Florida. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Shelters Fill Up Before the Storm - The Superdome was used as an emergency shelter, before the arrival of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Katrina killed at least seven when it moved through Miami-Dade County in Florida. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

President Bush Views Damage  - Here former President George W. Bush surveys from Air Force One the damage left by Hurricane Katrina on Aug. 31, 2005. Air Force One descended to about 5,000 feet to allow Bush to view the destruction in New Orleans; Gulfport and Biloxi in Mississippi; Mobile, Alabama; and other cities before landing in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

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President Bush Views Damage  - Here former President George W. Bush surveys from Air Force One the damage left by Hurricane Katrina on Aug. 31, 2005. Air Force One descended to about 5,000 feet to allow Bush to view the destruction in New Orleans; Gulfport and Biloxi in Mississippi; Mobile, Alabama; and other cities before landing in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

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Search and Rescue - People are taken ashore in a boat after being rescued from their homes in high water in the Ninth Ward. The devastation was widespread throughout the city with water reaching 12 feet high in some areas. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Search and Rescue - People are taken ashore in a boat after being rescued from their homes in high water in the Ninth Ward. The devastation was widespread throughout the city with water reaching 12 feet high in some areas. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Extreme Flooding Takes Over - A car sits submerged next to a row of houses in the Edgewood neighborhood on Sept. 6, 2005, in New Orleans. Despite the dangers of toxic flood waters and disease, some tried to wait out the flooding in their neighborhoods from Hurricane Katrina. (Photo: Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

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Extreme Flooding Takes Over - A car sits submerged next to a row of houses in the Edgewood neighborhood on Sept. 6, 2005, in New Orleans. Despite the dangers of toxic flood waters and disease, some tried to wait out the flooding in their neighborhoods from Hurricane Katrina. (Photo: Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

Tragedy - A wheelchair and hospital beds covered in mud and debris sit in a room at the St. Rita's Nursing Home Sept. 14, 2005, in St. Bernard, Louisiana. The owners of St. Rita's Nursing home, Mable and Salvador Mangano, were formally charged with 34 counts of negligent homicide after they allegedly failed to evacuate patients at the home prior to Hurricane Katrina. Thirty-four people died after they drowned in the rising flood waters. (Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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Tragedy - A wheelchair and hospital beds covered in mud and debris sit in a room at the St. Rita's Nursing Home Sept. 14, 2005, in St. Bernard, Louisiana. The owners of St. Rita's Nursing home, Mable and Salvador Mangano, were formally charged with 34 counts of negligent homicide after they allegedly failed to evacuate patients at the home prior to Hurricane Katrina. Thirty-four people died after they drowned in the rising flood waters. (Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Worst Nightmare - A woman is rescued from a school rooftop after being trapped with dozens of others in high water in Orleans parish. Katrina made landfall as a Category 4 storm with sustained winds in excess of 135 mph. The school, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology, in the Lower 9th Ward, had closed after Katrina left it under 14 feet of water. The school re-opened in August 2007. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Worst Nightmare - A woman is rescued from a school rooftop after being trapped with dozens of others in high water in Orleans parish. Katrina made landfall as a Category 4 storm with sustained winds in excess of 135 mph. The school, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Charter School for Science and Technology, in the Lower 9th Ward, had closed after Katrina left it under 14 feet of water. The school re-opened in August 2007. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Holding on to Remnants of the Past - Thomas Walker, the sexton of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, carries a bronze plaque from the church, which was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina, as he walks with lifetime church member Melba Smith in Biloxi, Miss. Biloxi was devastated by Hurricane Katrina and hundreds are feared dead along the Mississippi coastline. (Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

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Holding on to Remnants of the Past - Thomas Walker, the sexton of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, carries a bronze plaque from the church, which was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina, as he walks with lifetime church member Melba Smith in Biloxi, Miss. Biloxi was devastated by Hurricane Katrina and hundreds are feared dead along the Mississippi coastline. (Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images)