Health Rewind: Susan G. Komen Launches African-American Breast Cancer Initiative

Plus, are fitter kids better readers and writers?

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New African-American Breast Cancer Program Coming to California - The Susan G Komen Breast Cancer Foundation is launching a new program for Black women in California. This statewide initiative will focus on breast cancer education, mammograms and early detection. In Los Angeles alone, Black women are 70 percent more likely to die from the disease than white women, says a press release. —Kellee Terrell (Photo: ranplett/Getty Images)

Big Tobacco Places Apology Ads in Only 13 Black Newspapers - The U.S. District Court has ordered Big Tobacco to apologize for misleading Americans about the dangers of smoking. Only problem: These apology ads will only run in a mere 13 Black newspapers, compared to 30 plus mainstream news outlets, Madame Noire writes. Blacks smoke less than whites, but are more likely to die from lung cancer.  (Photo: Phil Walter/Getty Images)

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Big Tobacco Places Apology Ads in Only 13 Black Newspapers - The U.S. District Court has ordered Big Tobacco to apologize for misleading Americans about the dangers of smoking. Only problem: These apology ads will only run in a mere 13 Black newspapers, compared to 30 plus mainstream news outlets, Madame Noire writes. Blacks smoke less than whites, but are more likely to die from lung cancer.  (Photo: Phil Walter/Getty Images)

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FDA Delays Decision on Weight Loss Pill - Orexigen Therapeutics Inc. announced that the FDA is taking three more months before making a decision about their controversial diet pill, Contrave. The pill was rejected in 2011 because it lacked sufficient data on how it affected consumers’ heart health, writes USA Today. If approved in September, Contrave will be the third FDA diet pill on the market.   (Photo: Image Source/Getty Images)

Lower Unemployment - Unemployment figure dips below 7 percent and stays there.(Photo: John Moore/Getty Images)

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Does a Bad Economy Encourage Racism? - When times are tough, racism is more prevalent, a new study suggests. Researchers from New York University found that during economic pitfalls, whites are more likely to perceive Black people through racial stereotypes, Time.com reports. (Photo: John Moore/Getty Images)

Taking Care of Business - On Aug. 6, Rep. Gregory Meeks and members of the Congressional Black Caucus Africa Taskforce will host ?A Dialogue With African CEOs,? which will include panel discussions and networking with African business and political leaders, U.S. private sector representatives and congressional lawmakers.  (Photo: AfricaImages/Getty Images)

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Blacks Are More Likely to Get Hit Crossing the Street - Why are Black pedestrians 60 percent more likely to die from getting hit by a car? Researchers believe it’s racial bias. Their new study found that drivers are less likely to yield for Black pedestrians compared to whites; Black pedestrians waited 32 percent longer to cross the street; and they were twice as likely to be passed by cars. (Photo: AfricaImages/Getty Images)

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Get Some Exercise  - Our internal clock reaches its peak around mid-morning. This is why it?s beneficial to exercise when the sun comes up. It helps boosts your body?s energy levels, producing an adrenaline rush lasting for hours, and even helps increase mental focus.  (Photo: Neustockimages/Getty Images)

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Black Women Do Workout: Marqkria Mcmiller - Marqkria Mcmiller, 28, shared her incredible 260-pound weight loss story with the Huffington Post. Mcmiller spent most of her childhood not being active, which led to her weighing 346 pounds by the age of 19. Determined not to die early, she slowly began exercising, eating healthier and now runs 5Ks. Read her story in its entirety here.(Photo: Neustockimages/Getty Images)

Parents of Autistic Children Spend Millions for Care - A new study suggests that parents with a child living with autism that also has intellectual disabilities may shell out $2.4 million over the span of their life. This number includes the cost of care and lost wages parents may suffer. Researchers found that for those with higher functioning skills, the cost is $1.4 million, writes USA Today. (Photo: Autism Awareness)

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Parents of Autistic Children Spend Millions for Care - A new study suggests that parents with a child living with autism that also has intellectual disabilities may shell out $2.4 million over the span of their life. This number includes the cost of care and lost wages parents may suffer. Researchers found that for those with higher functioning skills, the cost is $1.4 million, writes USA Today. (Photo: Autism Awareness)

Know Your Skin Type - It?s a simple, yet mandatory set: If you have oily or combination skin, use products such as serums and gels made for your type of skin that won?t clog pores. If you have dry or normal skin, creams and lotions are for you. Stop by your local Sephora for a free skin test.  (Photo: Strauss/Curtis/Corbis)

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No, Acne Cannot Be Cured - A recent study found that acne cannot be cured, but it can be treated. Researchers from Wake Forest University suggest that not treating acne will make it worse and that the best mode of treatment is a combination of topical crème and oral antibiotics. Over 80 million Americans have had an acne breakout in their lifetime. (Photo: Strauss/Curtis/Corbis)

2. They Really Understand Your Home Life - Sure, you may tell your friends what goes on at home and about the fight you had with your parents, but the only people that really understand what you're going through are your siblings. (Photo: Blend Images/Kris Timken/Getty Images)

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Are Fitter Kids Better Readers? - Overweight kids tend to have lower reading and language skills than kids with a healthier weight. A new report found that fitter students have stronger brain activity and response while reading compared to their more overweight peers, HealthDay writes. Stronger brain responses to words tend to make someone a stronger reader and writer, researchers believe. (Photo: Blend Images/Kris Timken/Getty Images)