TIME Magazine's Top Black Fashion Icons of All Time

TIME Magazine names the best in the fashion world.

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Naomi Campbell - Each year TIME magazine rolls out their highly coveted list of “ALL-TIME” most influential style stars since the magazine’s 1923 launch, and this year the list is broken down into categories of Designers & Brands, Models, Muses, Photographers, Editors & Stylists and Style & Design. While the list of 100 luminaries lacks diversity, it does manage to highlight fashion icons such as Naomi Campbell and FLOTUS Michelle Obama. See who else made the cut.Naomi Campbell was the first Black model on the covers of French and British Vogue and the supermodel boldly broke through the predominantly white industry in the 1980s and '90s.  (Photo: Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images)

Iman - Iman became one of the first Black supermodels after leaving Somalia as a refugee. Although she retired in 1989, she still influences Black women with her cosmetic line that caters to skin of color. She's also an activist for human rights issues. (Photo: Chelsea Lauren/Getty Images for The Fashionable Mom)

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Iman - Iman became one of the first Black supermodels after leaving Somalia as a refugee. Although she retired in 1989, she still influences Black women with her cosmetic line that caters to skin of color. She's also an activist for human rights issues. (Photo: Chelsea Lauren/Getty Images for The Fashionable Mom)

Beverly Johnson - In August 1974, Beverly Johnson became the first Black model to ever appear on the cover of Vogue. Since then she's appeared on more than 500 magazine covers, fought against the unrealistic weight expectations models face, and runs the Beverly Johnson Hair Collection. (Photo: Gems/Getty Images)

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Beverly Johnson - In August 1974, Beverly Johnson became the first Black model to ever appear on the cover of Vogue. Since then she's appeared on more than 500 magazine covers, fought against the unrealistic weight expectations models face, and runs the Beverly Johnson Hair Collection. (Photo: Gems/Getty Images)

Josephine Baker - In the 1920s, Josephine Baker left the prudish United States for the European stage where she became known for her barely-there ensembles, banana skirts, funky accessories and gelled-back hair.   (Photo: General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)

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Josephine Baker - In the 1920s, Josephine Baker left the prudish United States for the European stage where she became known for her barely-there ensembles, banana skirts, funky accessories and gelled-back hair. (Photo: General Photographic Agency/Getty Images)

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Michael Jackson - The King of Pop sparked so many fashion trends during his time: the single white glove, the flashy jackets, his penny loafers. They were all iconic pieces emulated for generations. (Photo: George Rose/Getty Images)

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Wondrous in White

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Michelle Obama - When Michelle Obama entered the scene with her gift for mixing high-end pieces with affordable finds we finally had someone in the White House the rest of us could look to for inspiration and a wardrobe we could actually afford to pull off.  (Photo: Chris Jackson - WPA Pool/Getty Images)

Robin Givhan - Robin Givhan was the first person to win the Pulitzer Prize in criticism by writing about fashion. She analyzes the fashion choices of the most influential women and criticized First Lady Michelle Obama for wearing shorts by writing, "Avoiding the appearance of queenly behavior is politically wise. But it does American culture no favors if a first lady tries so hard to be average that she winds up looking common."  (Photo: Rabbani Solimene/Getty Images for Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week)

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Robin Givhan - Robin Givhan was the first person to win the Pulitzer Prize in criticism by writing about fashion. She analyzes the fashion choices of the most influential women and criticized First Lady Michelle Obama for wearing shorts by writing, "Avoiding the appearance of queenly behavior is politically wise. But it does American culture no favors if a first lady tries so hard to be average that she winds up looking common." (Photo: Rabbani Solimene/Getty Images for Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week)