The Best Debut Albums From Los Angeles Rappers

These stars rep their city by making good first impressions.

The Best Debut Albums From Los Angeles Rappers - Hip hop may have started in the Bronx, but Los Angeles has been an integral part of the growth of the music and culture for decades. There have been some ebbs and flows, but it's safe to say that L.A. and its artists are putting out some of the hottest music today with ScHoolBoy Q and Kid Ink having already released debuts this year, and YG's due next week (March 18). These young guns are simply carrying on a long tradition of L.A. rappers who have delivered memorable debuts. Here are 20 that everyone should have. (Photos from left: Interscope, Death Row, Aftermath/Interscope)

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The Best Debut Albums From Los Angeles Rappers - Hip hop may have started in the Bronx, but Los Angeles has been an integral part of the growth of the music and culture for decades. There have been some ebbs and flows, but it's safe to say that L.A. and its artists are putting out some of the hottest music today with ScHoolBoy Q and Kid Ink having already released debuts this year, and YG's due next week (March 18). These young guns are simply carrying on a long tradition of L.A. rappers who have delivered memorable debuts. Here are 20 that everyone should have. (Photos from left: Interscope, Death Row, Aftermath/Interscope)

The Game, The Documentary  - The Documentary came at a perfect time for Game. G-Unit was riding high, and fans were hungry for an artist from the West to ride for — and Dr. Dre’s beats didn’t hurt. Though each of his follow up efforts have been strong in their own right, Game’s ability to truly make his debut a musical documentary of his life up to that point when it dropped in 2005 makes it territory that should go untouched.  (Photo: Courtesy of Interscope Records)

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Game, The Documentary - Released in early 2005, Game's debut came at a point when his then-crew, G-Unit, was nearly unstoppable. But, it was also when the West Coast hadn't had an artist blow nationally in some time. Anchored by Dr. Dre's production, the project changed that and is viewed as a modern day classic.(Photo: Aftermath/Interscope)

The Chronic Gift Set - Dr. Dre's classic solo debut, The Chronic, celebrated its 20th anniversary earlier this month. Though there wasn't a flossy reissue (we blame Suge, somehow), you can make your own box set for your favorite G-funk afficionado: The Chronic on CD, some Zig-Zag rolling papers, which inspired the album's cover, and a nice flip lighter. And maybe a cellophane baggy of oregano if you really want to round out the concept.  (Photo: Death Row Records)

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Dr. Dre, The Chronic - After a successful run as a member of N.W.A., Dr. Dre stepped out on his own — with much acclaim — on his 1992 debut. Full of funk and Snoop features, the album is one of the many feathers in Dre's cap as one of the greatest producers of all-time. (Photo: Death Row, Interscope)

Snoop Dogg, Doggystyle - Based on his name, it's really no surprise that Snoop featured a dog on the album cover of his debut. In addition to the cartoon cover — which was a riff on the iconic image of Snoopy lying on a doghouse — the video for "Who Am I? (What's My Name?)" featured the Cali native morphing into a canine. (Photo: Death Row Records)

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Snoop Dogg, Doggystyle - A year after opening ears with his work on Dre's debut, Snoop solidified himself as a powerhouse all his own with his classic first album. Two decades later, the Doggfather is still at it. (Photo: Death Row Records)

Album of the Year –  Kendrick Lamar, good kid, m.A.A.d city - good kid, m.A.A.d city set the tone for Kendrick Lamar's rule. K. Dot's major label debut is a rap feast that resonates for showing the Compton rapper's artistic maturity without sacrificing his underground roots. (Photo: Interscope Records)

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Kendrick Lamar, good kid, m.A.A.d city - The latest in a lengthy line of Dr. Dre co-signs to take the rap and mainstream worlds by storm, Kendrick Lamar earned critical and fan appreciation with his 2012 debut. It's become the latest standard for which other MCs strive. (Photo: Interscope Records)

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"Straight Outta Compton," N.W.A. - There's no doubt about it: This ground-breaking classic, the title track from N.W.A.'s 1988 studio debut, put Compton on the map and made gangsta rap ? and L.A.'s gang culture ? a worldwide phenomenon. 

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N.W.A, Straight Outta Compton - A watershed release, N.W.A's 1988 debut shifted the sound and tone of hip hop, breaking open a lane of gangsta rap and bringing its messages to a wider audience than ever before. (Photo: Ruthless, Priority, EMI)

Xzibit, At the Speed of Life - Long before he was coming through TV screens hosting shows, Xzibit brought his energetic, tenacious flow to his 1996 debut, which included the hit "Paparazzi."(Photo: Loud, RCA)

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Xzibit, At the Speed of Life - Long before he was coming through TV screens hosting shows, Xzibit brought his energetic, tenacious flow to his 1996 debut, which included the hit "Paparazzi."(Photo: Loud, RCA)

Ice-T, Rhyme Pays - Owning the distinction of being the first rap album to be branded with a Parental Advisory warning, Ice-T's 1987 release kicked down doors for gangsta rap.(Photo: Sire/Warner Bros Records)

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Ice-T, Rhyme Pays - Owning the distinction of being the first rap album to be branded with a Parental Advisory warning, Ice-T's 1987 release kicked down doors for gangsta rap.(Photo: Sire/Warner Bros Records)

Eazy-E, Eazy-Duz-It - Released just a month after N.W.A's Straight Outta Compton, group member Eazy-E's debut included a handful of memorable cuts, including a remix to the hit "Boyz-n-the-Hood."(Photo: Ruthless, Priority)

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Eazy-E, Eazy-Duz-It - Released just a month after N.W.A's Straight Outta Compton, group member Eazy-E's debut included a handful of memorable cuts, including a remix to the hit "Boyz-n-the-Hood."(Photo: Ruthless, Priority)

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Ice Cube, AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted - Following his rift with N.W.A, Ice Cube launched his solo career with this classic 1990 album, which mixed socio-political commentary with aggresive tones. (Photo: Proirity Records)

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DJ Quik, Quik Is the Name - Released shortly before his 21st birthday, DJ Quik's debut proved that he was a true musical force, as he not only rapped and crafted his hooks, but produced the entire record. (Photo: Profile)

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DJ Quik, Quik Is the Name - Released shortly before his 21st birthday, DJ Quik's debut proved that he was a true musical force, as he not only rapped and crafted his hooks, but produced the entire record. (Photo: Profile)

MC Eiht - Compton Most Wanted front man MC Eiht is responsible for the soundtrack's undeniable highlight, the classic "Streiht Up Menace." He played a supporting role, as hardened O.G. A-Wax, in the film as well. He quietly released independent albums and collaborated with Snoop, Spice 1 and others in the new millenium, but made a big return to the spotlight last year on Kendrick Lamar's "m.A.A.d. city," a tribute to Compton's dark side.   (Photo: Epic Street)

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MC Eiht, We Come Strapped - Released in 1994, MC Eiht's debut was another in a long line of gangsta rap albums from the heart of L.A., as he told tales of a kid from the streets of Compton. (Photo: Epic Street)

Tha Dogg Pound, Dogg Food - Comprised of Kurupt and Daz Dillinger, Tha Dogg Pound dropped their debut in 1995 on Death Row, but not without controversy, as the release was protested by Time Warner shareholders. (Photo: Death Row/Intersope)

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Tha Dogg Pound, Dogg Food - Comprised of Kurupt and Daz Dillinger, Tha Dogg Pound dropped their debut in 1995 on Death Row, but not without controversy, as the release was protested by Time Warner shareholders. (Photo: Death Row/Intersope)

The Pharcyde, Bizarre Ride II the Pharcyde - A deviation from the gangsta rap that had been coming out of L.A. in the 1990s, this 1992 debut from The Pharcyde was both sonically varied (a bit more jazzy) and a lyrical risk, infused with humor instead of violence. It contained the classic single "Passin' Me By."(Photo: Delicious Vinyl)

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The Pharcyde, Bizarre Ride II the Pharcyde - A deviation from the gangsta rap that had been coming out of L.A. in the 1990s, this 1992 debut from The Pharcyde was both sonically varied (a bit more jazzy) and a lyrical risk, infused with humor instead of violence. It contained the classic single "Passin' Me By."(Photo: Delicious Vinyl)

Jurassic 5, Jurassic 5 - Released two years before their Interscope debut, Quality Control, this 1998 drop from Jurassic 5 deserves much credit for initally establishing the group as well as catching the ear of the major label. (Photo: Pan Records)

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Jurassic 5, Jurassic 5 - Released two years before their Interscope debut, Quality Control, this 1998 drop from Jurassic 5 deserves much credit for initally establishing the group as well as catching the ear of the major label. (Photo: Pan Records)

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Cypress Hill, Cypress Hill - Containing the single "How I Could Just Kill a Man," Cypress Hill's 1991 self-titled debut was well-received and went on to go double platinum. (Photo: Ruffhouse, Columbia, SME Records)

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Cypress Hill, Cypress Hill - Containing the single "How I Could Just Kill a Man," Cypress Hill's 1991 self-titled debut was well-received and went on to go double platinum. (Photo: Ruffhouse, Columbia, SME Records)

Kid Frost, Hispanic Causing Pain - With his 1990 debut, Kid Frost broke down barriers for Latino rappers. At just ten songs, the disc included the hit "La Raza."(Photo: Virgin Records)

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Kid Frost, Hispanic Causing Pain - With his 1990 debut, Kid Frost broke down barriers for Latino rappers. At just ten songs, the disc included the hit "La Raza."(Photo: Virgin Records)

Warren G, Regulate...G Funk Era - When Warren G released his debut album, Regulate...G Funk Era, on June 7, the West Coast had the rap game sewn up. The lead single, "Regulate," which features a soulful outline of gang life courtesy of Nate Dogg's vocal chops, transcended beyond the borders of Compton, pushing the album to three million copies sold in the U.S.The overall laid back sound coupled with Warren G’s hardcore lyrics was just the right mixture to garner street cred and commercial success. It debuted at No. 2 on the Billboard 200, selling 176,000 its opening week.(Photo: Def Jam, Violator)

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Warren G, Regulate...G Funk Era - Known for its breakout smash "Regulate," the funky vibes of Warren G's 1994 debut album helped him score two Grammy nominations. (Photo: Def Jam, Violator)

The Rundown: ScHoolBoy Q, Oxymoron - Now is the time for ScHoolBoy Q. The TDE rapper is eager to launch himself into the conversation as one of the best new rappers doing it. ("Tell Kendrick move from the throne, I came for it," he raps on "Break the Bank.") He's on his way there with his major-label debut, Oxymoron, which finds Q blending stories of his gang-related past with groovy joints for a nicely blended effort. Read on for a track-by-track recap.(Photo: TDE, Interscope)

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ScHoolboy Q, Oxymoron - In stores for under a month now, ScHoolboy Q's major label debut rides the momentum set up by K. Dot but offers something all its own, with the T.D.E. rapper's specific brand of gangsta. (Photo: TDE, Interscope)

Tyler, the Creator, Goblin - After earning substantial buzz for his sound, voice and antics, Tyler released his retail debut in 2011 riding the success of his viral single, "Yonkers."(Photo: XL Records)

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Tyler, the Creator, Goblin - After earning substantial buzz for his sound, voice and antics, Tyler released his retail debut in 2011 riding the success of his viral single, "Yonkers."(Photo: XL Records)

Earl Sweashirt, Doris - Earl Sweatshirt emerged from education exile in Samoa to finally put out his debut LP, Doris, a continuum of mid '90s backpack rap. While Earl pushed the labyrinthine flows of Odd Future cohorts with cuts like "Whoa" (featuring Tyler, the Creator) and "Centurion" (featuring Vince Staples), he hit a personal note with the cut "Chum."(Photo: Sony Music)

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Earl Sweatshirt, Doris - The mystique surrounding Earl Sweatshirt was finally lifted when he released his first retail project, which followed up years of buzz based on a previous mixtape that had gained momentum while he was at boarding school and his Odd Future family was creating chaos.(Photo: Sony Music)