10 Years Later: How Hurricane Katrina Changed New Orleans

How are Black people in Crescent City doing since the storm?

A Decade Since Destruction - A decade ago, Hurricane Katrina stormed through the Gulf Coast, destroying the New Orleans area as many lost relatives while others were forced to relocate and start their lives over in new cities. BET marked the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina with the BET News special Katrina 10 Years Later: Through Hell in High Water, which aired on Aug. 26. You can watch the full special here. Here we take a look at the socio-economic changes African-Americans have faced since the natural disaster.   (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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A Decade Since Destruction - A decade ago, Hurricane Katrina stormed through the Gulf Coast, destroying the New Orleans area as many lost relatives while others were forced to relocate and start their lives over in new cities. BET marked the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina with the BET News special Katrina 10 Years Later: Through Hell in High Water, which aired on Aug. 26. You can watch the full special here. Here we take a look at the socio-economic changes African-Americans have faced since the natural disaster. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Black Population Is Dropping - Recent Census data shows that African-Americans are growing in population in suburban areas surrounding New Orleans as prices of living in the city increases with its popularity. Black residents previously were two-thirds of the population. They are now 58.8 percent. Presently, white residents are 31 percent of the population, growing from a quarter of the population a decade ago. The city council is currently working with developers to set aside affordable housing in new apartment complexes in effort to curb the growing crisis of gentrification.   (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Black Population Is Dropping - Recent Census data shows that African-Americans are growing in population in suburban areas surrounding New Orleans as prices of living in the city increases with its popularity. Black residents previously were two-thirds of the population. They are now 58.8 percent. Presently, white residents are 31 percent of the population, growing from a quarter of the population a decade ago. The city council is currently working with developers to set aside affordable housing in new apartment complexes in effort to curb the growing crisis of gentrification. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Crime Harms African-American Males - In 2004, before Katrina hit, the Crescent City saw 264 murders. Following the hurricane, the number of homicides in Crescent City dropped to zero for a brief time. But in 2006, the year following, it shot back up to 162. Of the neighborhoods with the most crime in New Orleans, young African-American men, 16 to 24, are most likely to commit and be victims of violent crimes, according to data collected by a team of researchers in 2014, when the city saw 150 murders.   (Photo: Sean Gardner/Getty Images)

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Crime Harms African-American Males - In 2004, before Katrina hit, the Crescent City saw 264 murders. Following the hurricane, the number of homicides in Crescent City dropped to zero for a brief time. But in 2006, the year following, it shot back up to 162. Of the neighborhoods with the most crime in New Orleans, young African-American men, 16 to 24, are most likely to commit and be victims of violent crimes, according to data collected by a team of researchers in 2014, when the city saw 150 murders.  (Photo: Sean Gardner/Getty Images)

Homelessness Has Decreased Drastically - Homelessness in New Orleans was at its peak post-Katrina in 2007, when an estimated 11,600 people did not have a place to call home. That number has now dropped drastically to 1,703, according to UNITY, a collective of homeless agencies.   (Photo: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

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Homelessness Has Decreased Drastically - Homelessness in New Orleans was at its peak post-Katrina in 2007, when an estimated 11,600 people did not have a place to call home. That number has now dropped drastically to 1,703, according to UNITY, a collective of homeless agencies. (Photo: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Income Gap Between Blacks and Whites Still Alarming - The latest stats show that the income for Blacks in New Orleans is 20 percent less than the average income of Blacks nationally as of 2013. "In 1999, 42 percent of New Orleans? black households earned in the lowest national income quintile. By 2013, 44 percent of black households earned in the lowest tier (less than $20,900)," the Data Center reports. Moreover employment among Black men has not seen a drastic change since 2000, as it remains at 57 percent.   (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Income Gap Between Blacks and Whites Still Alarming - The latest stats show that the income for Blacks in New Orleans is 20 percent less than the average income of Blacks nationally as of 2013. "In 1999, 42 percent of New Orleans’ black households earned in the lowest national income quintile. By 2013, 44 percent of black households earned in the lowest tier (less than $20,900)," the Data Center reports. Moreover employment among Black men has not seen a drastic change since 2000, as it remains at 57 percent. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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From Top to Bottom, Education Still Needs More Attention - Since 2000, there has been no increase of Bachelor degrees held by Black men over the age of 25 living in the city. The number remains at 12 percent. For Black women, it is 19 percent. For the younger students, the quality of their education has improved, as 88 percent in Orleans Parish students attend schools that meet the Louisiana's state standards. Pre-Katrina that number was only at 30 percent. However graduation rates for six of the eight parishes are below 80 percent, according to the Data Center.   (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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From Top to Bottom, Education Still Needs More Attention - Since 2000, there has been no increase of Bachelor degrees held by Black men over the age of 25 living in the city. The number remains at 12 percent. For Black women, it is 19 percent. For the younger students, the quality of their education has improved, as 88 percent in Orleans Parish students attend schools that meet the Louisiana's state standards. Pre-Katrina that number was only at 30 percent. However graduation rates for six of the eight parishes are below 80 percent, according to the Data Center. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Growth With Minority-Owned Businesses - The good news is that more minority-owned businesses have launched post-Katrina. These businesses are more likely to hire other minorities and give back to their communities. Twenty-seven percent of businesses were minority owned in 2007, according to The Data Center. This is above the national average. However, the report questions whether these businesses are receiving the same monetary gains as other start ups in the city.   (Photo: LEE CELANO/AFP/Getty Images)

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Growth With Minority-Owned Businesses - The good news is that more minority-owned businesses have launched post-Katrina. These businesses are more likely to hire other minorities and give back to their communities. Twenty-seven percent of businesses were minority owned in 2007, according to The Data Center. This is above the national average. However, the report questions whether these businesses are receiving the same monetary gains as other start ups in the city. (Photo: LEE CELANO/AFP/Getty Images)

What Will New Orleans Culture Look Like in the Future? - With gentrification follows a change of culture. New Orleans is widely known for its unique colorful and vibrant Mardi Gras festivities, jazz festivals, creole cuisine and bounce music, all facets that are heavily influenced by African-American culture. Many artists have come out of these scenes bringing the city's energy to the world. But many now wonder if New Orleans will retain its novelty as new residents move in quickly, the atmosphere becomes more touristy and the city looks to grow its global appeal.    (Photo: Sean Gardner/Getty Images)

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What Will New Orleans Culture Look Like in the Future? - With gentrification follows a change of culture. New Orleans is widely known for its unique colorful and vibrant Mardi Gras festivities, jazz festivals, creole cuisine and bounce music, all facets that are heavily influenced by African-American culture. Many artists have come out of these scenes bringing the city's energy to the world. But many now wonder if New Orleans will retain its novelty as new residents move in quickly, the atmosphere becomes more touristy and the city looks to grow its global appeal. (Photo: Sean Gardner/Getty Images)