Hip Hop Dances That Originated in New York

The Dope Walk, Harlem Shake, the Shmoney Dance and more.

Walk This Way - Harlem's A$AP Ferg just dropped the video for "Dope Walk" –– shot during NY Fashion Week with cameos from Beyoncé, Justin Bieber and Kanye West –– where he and a few movers and shakers do their best fiend lean while paying tribute to fashion model Cara Delevingne's deadly runway walk.This new dance floor seizure sensation is the latest of movements to have sprouted from The Big Apple in recent years. Read on.(Photo: Traplord via YouTube.com)

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Walk This Way - Harlem's A$AP Ferg just dropped the video for "Dope Walk" –– shot during NY Fashion Week with cameos from Beyoncé, Justin Bieber and Kanye West –– where he and a few movers and shakers do their best fiend lean while paying tribute to fashion model Cara Delevingne's deadly runway walk.This new dance floor seizure sensation is the latest of movements to have sprouted from The Big Apple in recent years. Read on.(Photo: Traplord via YouTube.com)

Shmoney Dance - With a flick of his cap, Brooklyn repper Bobby Shmurda debuted the Shmoney Dance, which had everyone from Bey to Jay intrigued. It premiered as his first viral hit, "Hot N***a. (Photo: GS9 Entertainment, Fetty Films)

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Shmoney Dance - With a flick of his cap, Brooklyn repper Bobby Shmurda debuted the Shmoney Dance, which had everyone from Bey to Jay intrigued. It premiered as his first viral hit, "Hot N***a. (Photo: GS9 Entertainment, Fetty Films)

The Harlem Shake - This dance recently resurfaced with a looser interpretation, but gained national attention in 2001 with Harlem rapper G-Dep and Diddy's music video for "Let's Get It," featuring members from Jesse Rutland's Harlem Shakers. It's said to be inspired by ancient Egyptians, according to Harlem's Al B, who is credited with originating the move.(Photo: Bad Boy Records)

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The Harlem Shake - This dance recently resurfaced with a looser interpretation, but gained national attention in 2001 with Harlem rapper G-Dep and Diddy's music video for "Let's Get It," featuring members from Jesse Rutland's Harlem Shakers. It's said to be inspired by ancient Egyptians, according to Harlem's Al B, who is credited with originating the move.(Photo: Bad Boy Records)

Chicken Noodle Soup - This extension of the Harlem Shake emerged in 2006 with DJ Webstar and Young B's smash hit of the same name. Using a series of steps like "let it rain," "clear it out" and "let's get it," the dance helped to enhance Harlem's basketball culture, providing entertainment in between games at Rucker and "baby" Rucker parks.(Photo: Universal Records)

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Chicken Noodle Soup - This extension of the Harlem Shake emerged in 2006 with DJ Webstar and Young B's smash hit of the same name. Using a series of steps like "let it rain," "clear it out" and "let's get it," the dance helped to enhance Harlem's basketball culture, providing entertainment in between games at Rucker and "baby" Rucker parks.(Photo: Universal Records)

Aunt Jackie - Harlem-based rapper/producer Jason Fox showcased his skills with the Hood Presidents in their 2007 for the synthesized catchy track "Aunt Jackie." In the video, first uploaded to MySpace, he and the crew perform a remix of the "running man" and "soul clap" to create the song's accompanying dance. Another a viral sensation.(Photo: Island Def Jam)

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Aunt Jackie - Harlem-based rapper/producer Jason Fox showcased his skills with the Hood Presidents in their 2007 for the synthesized catchy track "Aunt Jackie." In the video, first uploaded to MySpace, he and the crew perform a remix of the "running man" and "soul clap" to create the song's accompanying dance. Another a viral sensation.(Photo: Island Def Jam)

Lean Back - Bronx-bred rapper Fat Joe, Remy Ma and the Terror Squad started a movement with "Lean Back," the lead single from their album True Story. In the music video, which features a cameo from Kevin Hart, he's everywhere, the Squad does the "lean back," aka the "rockaway."(Photo: Universal Records)

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Lean Back - Bronx-bred rapper Fat Joe, Remy Ma and the Terror Squad started a movement with "Lean Back," the lead single from their album True Story. In the music video, which features a cameo from Kevin Hart, he's everywhere, the Squad does the "lean back," aka the "rockaway."(Photo: Universal Records)

The Tony Yayo Dance - When G-Unit member Tony Yayo dropped the video for "So Seductive," featuring 50 Cent, everyone was talking about the Queens rapper's signature move. Beyoncé does her own rendition of it during her performance of "***Flawless."(Photo: Interscope/G Unit Records)

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The Tony Yayo Dance - When G-Unit member Tony Yayo dropped the video for "So Seductive," featuring 50 Cent, everyone was talking about the Queens rapper's signature move. Beyoncé does her own rendition of it during her performance of "***Flawless."(Photo: Interscope/G Unit Records)

The Kid 'n Play - Christopher Reid and Christopher Martin (of the Bronx and Queens, respectively) had everyone jumping around after they debuted their two-person dance in the 1990 blockbuster House Party.(Photo: New Line Cinema)

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The Kid 'n Play - Christopher Reid and Christopher Martin (of the Bronx and Queens, respectively) had everyone jumping around after they debuted their two-person dance in the 1990 blockbuster House Party.(Photo: New Line Cinema)

The Wop - This old-school dance emerged in the '80s with B-Fats, a Harlem transplant who moved to the historic neighborhood when he was 10 years old. His music career peaked with the 1986 hit "Woppit" produced by Teddy Riley. From the song emerged the dance.(Photo: Bad Boy Records)

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The Wop - This old-school dance emerged in the '80s with B-Fats, a Harlem transplant who moved to the historic neighborhood when he was 10 years old. His music career peaked with the 1986 hit "Woppit" produced by Teddy Riley. From the song emerged the dance.(Photo: Bad Boy Records)

Break-dancing - B-boy pioneers such as Bronx native Richard "Crazy Legs" Colon and Ken Smith, former vice president of the Rock Steady Crew, helped to make break-dancing so popular it was incorporated as one of the five elements of hip hop. The movement inspired tracks like Kurtis Blow's "The Breaks," Herbie Hancock's "Rockit" and KRS-One's "Step Into a World (Rapture Delight)."(Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

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Break-dancing - B-boy pioneers such as Bronx native Richard "Crazy Legs" Colon and Ken Smith, former vice president of the Rock Steady Crew, helped to make break-dancing so popular it was incorporated as one of the five elements of hip hop. The movement inspired tracks like Kurtis Blow's "The Breaks," Herbie Hancock's "Rockit" and KRS-One's "Step Into a World (Rapture Delight)."(Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)