The Art of Black History

Black culture takes shape in many forms.

?The Problem We All Live With? (1963) - See the artistic contributions of notable African-American artists. ? Britt Middleton  This powerful piece by Norman Rockwell shows military officers leading 6-year-old Ruby Bridges into a New Orleans Public school under court-ordered integration following the landmark Brown v. Board of Education (1954) ruling. It is currently on display at the White House. (Photo: Wiki commons)

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“The Problem We All Live With” (1963) - See the artistic contributions of notable African-American artists. — Britt Middleton This powerful piece by Norman Rockwell shows military officers leading 6-year-old Ruby Bridges into a New Orleans Public school under court-ordered integration following the landmark Brown v. Board of Education (1954) ruling. It is currently on display at the White House. (Photo: Wiki commons)

"The Sugar Shack" (1971) - Painter Ernie Barnes was credited by many as the leader of the ?Black Romantic? genre of art. This rhythmic piece was featured as the cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album I Want You and also appeared in the closing credits of the 1970s sitcom Good Times. (Photo: Tamla Records)

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"The Sugar Shack" (1971) - Painter Ernie Barnes was credited by many as the leader of the “Black Romantic” genre of art. This rhythmic piece was featured as the cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album I Want You and also appeared in the closing credits of the 1970s sitcom Good Times. (Photo: Tamla Records)

"Sir Charles, Alias Willie Harris" (1972) - This painting by Barkley Leonnard Hendricks is described as "thoughtful and vigilant" by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., where the piece is on display. "More than life-size, this imposing figure clearly signals 1970s fashion, pop culture, and the assertion of Black identity in the generation following the civil rights era." (Photo: Courtesy National Gallery of Art, nga.gov)

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"Sir Charles, Alias Willie Harris" (1972) - This painting by Barkley Leonnard Hendricks is described as "thoughtful and vigilant" by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., where the piece is on display. "More than life-size, this imposing figure clearly signals 1970s fashion, pop culture, and the assertion of Black identity in the generation following the civil rights era." (Photo: Courtesy National Gallery of Art, nga.gov)

"Ethiopia Awakening" (1910) - Sculptor Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller often used African themes and folklore in her work, which has been featured in museums in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Paris. (Sculpture: Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller)

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"Ethiopia Awakening" (1910) - Sculptor Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller often used African themes and folklore in her work, which has been featured in museums in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Paris. (Sculpture: Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller)

"African Nude" (1980) - This piece by James Lesesne Wells draws inspiration from the style of odalisques, the sexualized renderings of female slaves in the Ottoman Empire popularized during the 19th century. (Photo: Courtesy National Gallery of Art, nga.gov)

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"African Nude" (1980) - This piece by James Lesesne Wells draws inspiration from the style of odalisques, the sexualized renderings of female slaves in the Ottoman Empire popularized during the 19th century. (Photo: Courtesy National Gallery of Art, nga.gov)

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"Mother" (1945) - The star in the corner of Charles Wilbert White's lithograph is said to represent the military. It has been viewed as a mother of waiting for the return of her son, a soldier, during WWII. (Photo: Courtesy National Gallery of Art, nga.gov)

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"Mother" (1945) - The star in the corner of Charles Wilbert White's lithograph is said to represent the military. It has been viewed as a mother of waiting for the return of her son, a soldier, during WWII. (Photo: Courtesy National Gallery of Art, nga.gov)

"Three placards" (1986) - Photographer Marilyn Nance captures a crowd of demonstrators paying tribute to civil rights icons Elijah Muhammad, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Her work is featured at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Marilyn Nance/Library of Congress)

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"Three placards" (1986) - Photographer Marilyn Nance captures a crowd of demonstrators paying tribute to civil rights icons Elijah Muhammad, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Her work is featured at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Marilyn Nance/Library of Congress)

"Forever Free" (1867) - This sculpture, a study in neoclassicism and paying tribute to the ratification of the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery, is one of Mary Edmonia Lewis' most acclaimed work. (Photo: Courtesy of Howard University)

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"Forever Free" (1867) - This sculpture, a study in neoclassicism and paying tribute to the ratification of the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery, is one of Mary Edmonia Lewis' most acclaimed work. (Photo: Courtesy of Howard University)

"Amistad Murals" (1938) - Artists Hale Aspacio Woodruff's murals consist of three panels documenting the capture of 53 slaves from present-day Sierra Leone in 1839. After the captives launched a revolt on board the Spanish slave ship La Amistad, they were tried before the U.S. Supreme Court and eventually won their freedom. The pieces are on display at Talladega College in Alabama. (Painting: Hale Aspacio Woodruff "Amistad" Courtesy of Talladega College)

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"Amistad Murals" (1938) - Artists Hale Aspacio Woodruff's murals consist of three panels documenting the capture of 53 slaves from present-day Sierra Leone in 1839. After the captives launched a revolt on board the Spanish slave ship La Amistad, they were tried before the U.S. Supreme Court and eventually won their freedom. The pieces are on display at Talladega College in Alabama. (Painting: Hale Aspacio Woodruff "Amistad" Courtesy of Talladega College)

"The Wedding Party: The History of Our Nation Is Really the Story of Families" (1996?1997) - This quilt by Dindga McCannon draws inspiration from childhood memories and her family's lineage. It has been featured at Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C. (Artist: Dindga McCannon)

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"The Wedding Party: The History of Our Nation Is Really the Story of Families" (1996–1997) - This quilt by Dindga McCannon draws inspiration from childhood memories and her family's lineage. It has been featured at Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C. (Artist: Dindga McCannon)

"Malcolm X Addressing Black Muslim Rally" (1963) -  Photographer by Gordon Parks, best known for his work in Life magazine, captured Malcolm X as he addressed his supporters in Chicago. (Photo: Courtesy of Gordon Parks)

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"Malcolm X Addressing Black Muslim Rally" (1963) - Photographer by Gordon Parks, best known for his work in Life magazine, captured Malcolm X as he addressed his supporters in Chicago. (Photo: Courtesy of Gordon Parks)