From Hattie To Halle: A Black History Of The Academy Awards

A look back at legendary moments at the Oscars.

From Hattie To Halle: A Black History Of The Academy Awards - The Oscars are today and while this year's edition, like many in the past, is largely leaving out the incredible work of so many Black actors, producers and directors, those who have managed to take home hardware made a lasting impact on the big screen. Here's our look at moments when African-Americans owned the Academy Awards by breaking down barriers.(Photos from left: John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images and Frank Micelotta/GettyImages)

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From Hattie To Halle: A Black History Of The Academy Awards - The Oscars are today and while this year's edition, like many in the past, is largely leaving out the incredible work of so many Black actors, producers and directors, those who have managed to take home hardware made a lasting impact on the big screen. Here's our look at moments when African-Americans owned the Academy Awards by breaking down barriers.(Photos from left: John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images and Frank Micelotta/GettyImages)

Ava DuVernay - Ava DuVernay's 2014 film Selma was the first film directed by a Black woman to be nominated for Best Picture. However, critics and fans of the film felt DuVernay was snubbed for not being nominated in the category for Best Director that year. Nonetheless, John Legend and Common landed a Best Original Song win for Glory.(Photo: Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images)

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Ava DuVernay - Ava DuVernay's 2014 film Selma was the first film directed by a Black woman to be nominated for Best Picture. However, critics and fans of the film felt DuVernay was snubbed for not being nominated in the category for Best Director that year. Nonetheless, John Legend and Common landed a Best Original Song win for Glory.(Photo: Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images)

Hattie McDaniel - Hattie McDaniel was the first African-American to receive an Oscar. She won Best Actress in a Supporting Role as Mammy in Gone With the Wind (1939).(Photo: Moviepix/Gettyimages)

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Hattie McDaniel - Hattie McDaniel was the first African-American to receive an Oscar. She won Best Actress in a Supporting Role as Mammy in Gone With the Wind (1939).(Photo: Moviepix/Gettyimages)

Dorothy Dandridge - Dorothy Dandridge was the first Black actress to receive a nomination for a lead role, which was Carmen Jones (1954). (Photo: Allan Grant/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images)

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Dorothy Dandridge - Dorothy Dandridge was the first Black actress to receive a nomination for a lead role, which was Carmen Jones (1954). (Photo: Allan Grant/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images)

Sidney Poitier - Sidney Poitier was the first Black male actor to receive an Oscar nod in 1958 for The Defiant Ones. Also, he is the first Black male to win an Oscar, which was for Best Actor in Lilies of the Field in 1963. (Photo: JB Lacroix/WireImage)

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Sidney Poitier - Sidney Poitier was the first Black male actor to receive an Oscar nod in 1958 for The Defiant Ones. Also, he is the first Black male to win an Oscar, which was for Best Actor in Lilies of the Field in 1963. (Photo: JB Lacroix/WireImage)

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Duke Ellington - Duke Ellington is the first African-American to be nominated for Best Original Score, which was Paris Blues (1961). (Photo: Bettmann / Contributor)

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Duke Ellington - Duke Ellington is the first African-American to be nominated for Best Original Score, which was Paris Blues (1961). (Photo: Bettmann / Contributor)

Rita Moreno - Rita Moreno is the first and only Latin American to win for Best Supporting Actress, which was for Westside Story (1961).(Photo: Taylor Hill/Getty Images)

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Rita Moreno - Rita Moreno is the first and only Latin American to win for Best Supporting Actress, which was for Westside Story (1961).(Photo: Taylor Hill/Getty Images)

Isaac Hayes - The late, great Isaac Hayes was the first African-American to win in the Best Original Song category for the theme from Shaft (1971). (Photo: Michael Putland/Getty Images)

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Isaac Hayes - The late, great Isaac Hayes was the first African-American to win in the Best Original Song category for the theme from Shaft (1971). (Photo: Michael Putland/Getty Images)

Suzanne de Passe - Suzanne de Passe is the first Black nominee for Best Original Screenplay for Lady Sings the Blues in 1972.(Photo: Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images)

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Suzanne de Passe - Suzanne de Passe is the first Black nominee for Best Original Screenplay for Lady Sings the Blues in 1972.(Photo: Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images)

Diana Ross - Diana Ross is the first Black actress to receive a nod for Best Actress from a debut film performance for Lady Sings the Blues in 1972.(Photo: Omar Vega/Getty Images)

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Diana Ross - Diana Ross is the first Black actress to receive a nod for Best Actress from a debut film performance for Lady Sings the Blues in 1972.(Photo: Omar Vega/Getty Images)

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Louis Gossett Jr. - Louis Gossett Jr. was the first Black actor to win Best Supporting Actor, which was in 1982 for An Officer and a Gentleman. (Photo: Paras Griffin/Getty Images)

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Louis Gossett Jr. - Louis Gossett Jr. was the first Black actor to win Best Supporting Actor, which was in 1982 for An Officer and a Gentleman. (Photo: Paras Griffin/Getty Images)

Irene Cara - The only Black woman to win a non-acting Oscar, which was for Best Original Song for "Flashdance" (1983). (Photo: Jordin Althaus/WireImage)

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Irene Cara - The only Black woman to win a non-acting Oscar, which was for Best Original Song for "Flashdance" (1983). (Photo: Jordin Althaus/WireImage)

Herbie Hancock - The only African-American to win Best Original Score, which was for Round Midnight (1986). (Photo: Francesco Prandoni/Getty Images)

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Herbie Hancock - The only African-American to win Best Original Score, which was for Round Midnight (1986). (Photo: Francesco Prandoni/Getty Images)

Prince - The late Prince was the first and only African-American to win an Oscar for Best Original Song Score, for his film Purple Rain. The category has since been retired.(Photo: Virginia Turbett/Redferns)

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Prince - The late Prince was the first and only African-American to win an Oscar for Best Original Song Score, for his film Purple Rain. The category has since been retired.(Photo: Virginia Turbett/Redferns)

Denzel Washington - Denzel Washington is the first Black actor to receive two Best Supporting Actor nominations — Cry Freedom (1987) and Glory (1989). He has since become the second African-American to win an award for Best Actor (Training Day, 2001). He was also a Best Actor nominee for Flight (2012) and Fences (2017). (Photo: Allen Berezovsky/Getty Images)

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Denzel Washington - Denzel Washington is the first Black actor to receive two Best Supporting Actor nominations — Cry Freedom (1987) and Glory (1989). He has since become the second African-American to win an award for Best Actor (Training Day, 2001). He was also a Best Actor nominee for Flight (2012) and Fences (2017). (Photo: Allen Berezovsky/Getty Images)

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Spike Lee - Spike Lee is the first African-American to receive an Oscar nod for Best Documentary, which was 4 Little Girls (1997). He shared the nomination with Samuel D. Pollard, who was the producer.   (Photo: Theo Wargo/WireImage)

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Spike Lee - Spike Lee is the first African-American to receive an Oscar nod for Best Documentary, which was 4 Little Girls (1997). He shared the nomination with Samuel D. Pollard, who was the producer. (Photo: Theo Wargo/WireImage)

John Singleton - For 1991's Boyz 'n the Hood (1991). Singleton was the first African-American to be nominated for Best Director and is the youngest person to receive this nod — he was only 23 years old at the time. (Photo: Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic)

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John Singleton - For 1991's Boyz 'n the Hood (1991). Singleton was the first African-American to be nominated for Best Director and is the youngest person to receive this nod — he was only 23 years old at the time. (Photo: Jason LaVeris/FilmMagic)

Queen Latifah - Queen Latifah is the first female hip hop artist to be nominated for an Oscar. In 2003, she received a nod for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Chicago. (Photo: Michael Kovac/Getty Images for Lifetime)

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Queen Latifah - Queen Latifah is the first female hip hop artist to be nominated for an Oscar. In 2003, she received a nod for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Chicago. (Photo: Michael Kovac/Getty Images for Lifetime)

Benicio del Toro - Benicio del Toro (while he isn't "black," the Puerto Rican actor is a person of color!) is the first and only actor to win an Oscar for a Spanish-speaking role. He was honored with Best Actor for Traffic. (2000). (Photo: Dan MacMedan/WireImage)

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Benicio del Toro - Benicio del Toro (while he isn't "black," the Puerto Rican actor is a person of color!) is the first and only actor to win an Oscar for a Spanish-speaking role. He was honored with Best Actor for Traffic. (2000). (Photo: Dan MacMedan/WireImage)

Halle Berry - Halle Berry is the first and only Black woman to receive an Oscar for Best Actress in a lead role, which was for Monster's Ball in 2001. (Photo: Frank Micelotta/GettyImages)

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Halle Berry - Halle Berry is the first and only Black woman to receive an Oscar for Best Actress in a lead role, which was for Monster's Ball in 2001. (Photo: Frank Micelotta/GettyImages)

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Jamie Foxx - Jamie Foxx is the first Black actor to earn two nominations in the same year (Collateral and Ray, 2004). Unfortunately, Foxx didn't nab a Best Actor nod last year for his lead role in Django Unchained, despite that film's five nominations. (Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage)

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Jamie Foxx - Jamie Foxx is the first Black actor to earn two nominations in the same year (Collateral and Ray, 2004). Unfortunately, Foxx didn't nab a Best Actor nod last year for his lead role in Django Unchained, despite that film's five nominations. (Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage)

Three 6 Mafia - Three 6 Mafia is the only hip hop group to win an Oscar. They won for Best Original Song for "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp" from the movie Hustle & Flow (2005).(Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage)

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Three 6 Mafia - Three 6 Mafia is the only hip hop group to win an Oscar. They won for Best Original Song for "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp" from the movie Hustle & Flow (2005).(Photo: Steve Granitz/WireImage)

Dreamgirls - Dreamgirls was the first film with African-American nominees for Best Supporting Actor (Eddie Murphy) and Best Supporting Actress (Jennifer Hudson). (Photo: CLEMENS BILAN/DDP/AFP via Getty Images)

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Dreamgirls - Dreamgirls was the first film with African-American nominees for Best Supporting Actor (Eddie Murphy) and Best Supporting Actress (Jennifer Hudson). (Photo: CLEMENS BILAN/DDP/AFP via Getty Images)

Jennifer Hudson - Jennifer Hudson is the first Black actress to win an Oscar for a debut film, which was for Dreamgirls (2006). (Photo: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic)

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Jennifer Hudson - Jennifer Hudson is the first Black actress to win an Oscar for a debut film, which was for Dreamgirls (2006). (Photo: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic)

Lee Daniels - Lee Daniels is the first openly gay Black man to receive Best Picture and Best Director nominations, both for Precious (2009). Many felt Daniels was a shoo-in for The Butler (2013), his most critically and commercially successful film to date, but the film failed to earn any nominations. (Photo: Taylor Hill/FilmMagic)

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Lee Daniels - Lee Daniels is the first openly gay Black man to receive Best Picture and Best Director nominations, both for Precious (2009). Many felt Daniels was a shoo-in for The Butler (2013), his most critically and commercially successful film to date, but the film failed to earn any nominations. (Photo: Taylor Hill/FilmMagic)

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Geoffrey Fletcher - Geoffrey Fletcher is the first African-American to win an Oscar for screen writing. He won Best Adapted Screenplay for Precious (2009). (Photo: Michael Buckner/WireImage)

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Geoffrey Fletcher - Geoffrey Fletcher is the first African-American to win an Oscar for screen writing. He won Best Adapted Screenplay for Precious (2009). (Photo: Michael Buckner/WireImage)

Quvenzhané Wallis - The 11-year-old, plucked from obscurity in Houma, Louisiana, wowed audiences and critics with her moving performance as Hushpuppy in Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), becoming the youngest Oscar nominee in history.

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Quvenzhané Wallis - The 11-year-old, plucked from obscurity in Houma, Louisiana, wowed audiences and critics with her moving performance as Hushpuppy in Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), becoming the youngest Oscar nominee in history.