The Kids Are Not Alright: The 411 on LGBT Bullying

How you can prevent this in your community.

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Slide 1: What You Need to Know - To commemorate Spirit Day on October 16, it’s important to point out factors that stand in the way of Black LGBT young people from feeling proud of being who they are. One of  them being bullying in schools. Read more about the stats, how prevalent is in our community and what you can do to stop it. —Kellee Terrell(Photo: Thomas Barwick/Getty Images)

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LGBT Students of Color and Harassment - While all LGBT youth are victims of bullying, a past report conducted by the Gay, Lesbian Straight Education Network (GLSEN) found that kids of color are more vulnerable and impacted in numerous ways. More than 75 percent were called “fa---t” and “d-ke” on a regular basis; more than 70 percent heard sexist remarks; and almost 50 percent heard racist remarks at school.  (Photo: Enrique Castro-Mendivil/Reuters)

What Are Some Ways to Recognize the Physical Signs of Bullying? - You can recognize if bullying is taking place if the victim:? Comes home with damaged or missing clothing or other belongings? Reports losing items, such as books, electronics, clothing or jewelry? Has unexplained injuries? Complains frequently of headaches, stomachaches or feeling sick? Has trouble sleeping or has frequent bad dreams? Has changes in eating habits? Hurt themselves? Are very hungry after school from not eating their lunch? Runs away from home? Loses interest in visiting or talking with friends? Is afraid of going to school or other activities with peers (Photo: John Lund/Drew Kelly/Getty Images)

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Black LGBT Students and Bullying - According to that same GLSEN report, Black LGBT students receive some of the most hostile treatment in our nation’s school systems. Eighty-five percent of Black LGBT students said they hear homophobic remarks; only half of Black students feel safe at school; and only 38 percent report these incidents to teachers.  (Photo: John Lund/Drew Kelly/Getty Images)

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Physical Violence - While Black LGBT students reported high levels of verbal harassment (82 percent), they had lower levels of physical violence. However, 27 percent said they were victims of being punched, shoved, kicked, stabbed, tripped and other forms of assault.  (Photo: Image Source/Getty Images)

It?s Not Child?s Play - The 2009 suicide of fifth grader Carl Walker Hoover is a prime example of just how serious the effects of bullying has on kids. Hoover, who was perceived to be gay, hung himself because he could no longer take the constant taunts. He was only 11 years old. Repeatedly being degraded and humiliated can lead to depression, drug use, dropping out of school and other mental health issues. (Photo: ABCnews.com)

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It’s Not Child’s Play - The 2009 suicide of fifth grader Carl Walker Hoover is a prime example of just how serious the effects of bullying has on kids. Hoover, who was perceived to be gay, hung himself because he could no longer take the constant taunts. He was only 11 years old. Repeatedly being degraded and humiliated can lead to depression, drug use, dropping out of school and other mental health issues. (Photo: ABCnews.com)

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How Many More Deaths Will Occur Before an End to Bullying? - Kids are killing themselves and each other as a result of bullying. In the most recent incident, a teenager who said he had been bullied killed three students and wounded two others at a suburban Cleveland high school.  BET.com breaks down some FAQs about bullying based on tips provided by the Department of Health and Human Services. ? Danielle Wright(Photo: LWA/Dann Tardif/Getty Images)

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Other Consequences of Bullying - Bullying also has an impact on one’s grades. A past report found that LGBT students of color who are bullied have GPAs 0.5 points lower than students who are not bullied. Also, to avoid being bullied, students will just stay home instead of coming to school. Twenty-five percent of Black LGBT youth has missed one full day of school compared to 6.3 percent of all Black youth and 3.5 percent of all white youth. (Photo: LWA/Dann Tardif/Getty Images)

Teen Bullies May Grow Into Criminals, Says Study - A recent University of Texas-Dallas study analyzed data from the U.K. and found that teens that bullied peers in school are more likely to commit some type of crime as adults — theft, assault and burglary. Also, past bullies were more likely to be repeat offenders, says a UT Dallas press release.  (Photo: Newsday/MCT /Landov)

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Why Gay-Straight Student Alliances Matter - Black LGBT students, especially those who attend schools with mostly Black students, are less likely to have affirming programs such as Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs). These types of programs help Black LGBT students feel more empowered and more adjusted at school, which in turn play into better grades and higher gradation rates. Learn how to start a GSA at your school here.  (Photo: Newsday/MCT/Landov)

What to Do When You Are Being Bullied? - If you are being bullied, don?t take the abuse:? Tell them to stop.  ? Walk away. Do not let them get to you. If you walk away or ignore them, they will not feel the satisfaction of getting a rise out of you. ? Protect yourself. Sometimes you cannot walk away. If you are being physically hurt, protect yourself so that you can get away. ? Tell an adult you trust. Talking to someone could help you figure out the best ways to deal with the problem. In some cases, adults need to get involved for the bullying to stop. ? Find a safe place. Go somewhere that you feel safe and secure, like the school library, a favorite teacher?s classroom or the office.? Stick together. Stay with a group or individuals that you trust. ? Find opportunities to make new fri...

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Think Before You Speak - One major way to fighting LGBT bullying is for straight kids to understand that words really do hurt. Think before you speak and understand the importance of respecting all students, despite your beliefs about sexual orientation. Remember: Bullying stops with you.  (Photo: Getty Images)

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The Importance of Straight Black Allies - Bullying can also be stopped with the help of allies — straight friends of LGBT — who choose to take a stand. By speaking out and educating other straight students on the importance of acceptance and respect, you are helping create a safe environment for all students.  (Photo: Tim Shaffer/Reuters)

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It Does Get Better - It can be overwhelming for Black LGBT students who feel they are alone dealing with homophobia whether it’s at school, at church or even at home. But please know that regardless of the negative things that people may say about you, it's not true. You are special just as you are. Read about more resources for LGBT youth here.  (Photo: Image Source/Getty Images)