BET Wire: A Weekly Political Roundup — State of the Union

Obama's presidential address takes center stage.

In Case You Missed It - Republicans leave President Obama scratching his head; Ben Carson kind of blames the spread of measles on immigrants; one lawmaker thinks it's OK if your food service worker doesn't wash his hands after a bathroom break ? and more. ? Joyce Jones (@BETpolitichick)

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In Case You Missed It - President Obama's first State of the Union address of his second term led the news this week. Sen. Marco Rubio had an awkward moment while delivering the GOP response, setting liberals a-Twitter, but as former White House adviser Van Jones cautions, sometimes "he who laughs last, laughs best." – Joyce Jones

Overall - "This country is at a point where unemployment is still high. People are hurting. We did not extend the unemployment benefits. So what we're looking for is hope and inspiration. I think he showed passion last night and hit on a number of the issues that are important to people at this time," said Rep. Maxine Waters (D-California).  (Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

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State of the Union - America is making progress but has a lot of work to do, Obama declared in his State of the Union address. He outlined a series of economic policies but hit the emotional high notes of the night when he discussed gun control and voting rights. A day later, he took the first of a series of trips around the country to pressure Congress into action on key issues.   (Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Salute! - Desiline Victor, a 102-year-old woman who stood for hours under the hot Florida sun to vote last fall, received a standing ovation during the State of the Union address. The president praised her as an example for all Americans to follow.  (Photo: AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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Salute! - Desiline Victor, a 102-year-old woman who stood for hours under the hot Florida sun to vote last fall, received a standing ovation during the State of the Union address. The president praised her as an example for all Americans to follow. (Photo: AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Guests of Honor - Nathaniel and Cleopatra Pendleton, parents of slain Chicago teen Hadiya, were among First Lady Michelle Obama's honored guests at the State of the Union event. The couple spent much of the day calling on lawmakers to strengthen gun control measures. (Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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Guests of Honor - Nathaniel and Cleopatra Pendleton, parents of slain Chicago teen Hadiya, were among First Lady Michelle Obama's honored guests at the State of the Union event. The couple spent much of the day calling on lawmakers to strengthen gun control measures. (Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Objection - As Obama road tested his call to increase the federal minimum wage, House Speaker John Boehner opposed the idea. "When you raise the price of employment, guess what happens? You get less of it,? Boehner told reporters at his weekly press conference. The Ohio Republican believes increasing the rate would make it more difficult for small businesses to hire workers.  (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

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Objection - As Obama road tested his call to increase the federal minimum wage, House Speaker John Boehner opposed the idea. "When you raise the price of employment, guess what happens? You get less of it,” Boehner told reporters at his weekly press conference. The Ohio Republican believes increasing the rate would make it more difficult for small businesses to hire workers. (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

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Gulp - Florida Sen. Marco Rubio takes a sip of water while delivering the Republican response to Obama's State of the Union address.    (Photo: ABC News)

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Awkward - Florida Sen. Marco Rubio had the honor of delivering the GOP response to Obama's State of the Union address. But it's the moment when he lunged forward to take a sip of water that's getting most of the attention. "I needed water, what am I going to do?" he joked on ABC's Good Morning America Wednesday. "God has a funny way of reminding us we’re human." (Photo: Huffington Post)

Be Afraid - Democrats and others may be laughing at Rubio and his Poland Spring moment now, but could be crying later, warns former White House adviser Van Jones. Republicans have high hopes for Rubio, young, savvy and Latino, to help reshape the party's image. "He is to the heart what Paul Ryan is to the head," said Jones, adding that he could be "dangerous" for Democrats.  (Photo: CNN)

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Be Afraid - Democrats and others may be laughing at Rubio and his Poland Spring moment now, but could be crying later, warns former White House adviser Van Jones. Republicans have high hopes for Rubio, young, savvy and Latino, to help reshape the party's image. "He is to the heart what Paul Ryan is to the head," said Jones, adding that he could be "dangerous" for Democrats. (Photo: CNN)

The Clyburn Connection - Jaime Harrison, a former aide to House Assistant Democratic Leader James Clyburn, is aiming high. Currently first vice chair of South Carolina's Democratic Party, Harrison is vying to become its first African-American chairman when it votes in May.  (Photo: Courtesy Politico)

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The Clyburn Connection - Jaime Harrison, a former aide to House Assistant Democratic Leader James Clyburn, is aiming high. Currently first vice chair of South Carolina's Democratic Party, Harrison is vying to become its first African-American chairman when it votes in May. (Photo: Courtesy Politico)

One for the History Books - Steven Brooks in March became the first lawmaker to be expelled from the Nevada Assembly, following a months-long emotional and legal downward spiral. Making matters worse, the two-term Democrat was arrested hours later in California, after leading officers on a high-speed chase.   (Photo: AP Photo/Cathleen Allison)

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Double Trouble - Nevada assemblyman Steven Brooks is having a very bad year. He was arrested on Feb. 10 for allegedly attacking a relative and then trying to grab a police officer's gun. The Las Vegas Democrat, currently on a three-week leave, was also arrested in January for allegedly threatening Assembly Speaker Marilyn Kirkpatrick.  (Photo: AP Photo/Cathleen Allison)

One Step Forward - The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly voted to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, adding provisions for immigrants, gays and lesbians, Native Americans and to speed up analysis of DNA rape kits. Now the question is whether it will stall in the House.  (Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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One Step Forward - The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly voted to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, adding provisions for immigrants, gays and lesbians, Native Americans and to speed up analysis of DNA rape kits. Now the question is whether it will stall in the House. (Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

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Seriously? - Former GOP Rep. Joe Walsh must like bad press. He's making headlines for being a deadbeat dad. As if that weren't bad enough, the ex-Illinois lawmaker criticized Michelle Obama for attending the funeral of slain teen Hadiya Pendleton to make a "political point."  (Photo: AP Photo/Harry Hamburg, File)

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Seriously? - Former GOP Rep. Joe Walsh must like bad press. He's making headlines for being a deadbeat dad. As if that weren't bad enough, the ex-Illinois lawmaker criticized Michelle Obama for attending the funeral of slain teen Hadiya Pendleton to make a "political point." (Photo: AP Photo/Harry Hamburg, File)

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Let's Do It Again - Democratic rising star Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed has options and there has been speculation lately over whether he might run for the U.S. Senate or join Obama's administration. “As you may know, [the president] is going to be here tomorrow. I wanted you to be the first to know, after a great deal of reflection and thought," Reed teased at a hearing on Feb. 13, “I have decided to offer myself for reelection as mayor!” (Photo: Moses Robinson/Getty Images for NBCUniversal)