Health Rewind: Ebola Patients in Atlanta Leave Hospital

Does marijuana lower teens' IQs?

American Ebola Patients Leaving Atlanta Hospital - Two of the American patients diagnosed with Ebola will be released from the Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Thursday. The hospital will have a press conference with one of the patients, Kent Brantly, and he will be speaking out about his illness. It?s not sure if the treatment they received has cured them from Ebola, USA Today reported.(Photo: AP Photo/Courtesy Jeremy Writebol)

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American Ebola Patients Leaving Atlanta Hospital - Two of the American patients diagnosed with Ebola will be released from the Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Thursday. The hospital will have a press conference with one of the patients, Kent Brantly, and he will be speaking out about his illness. It’s not sure if the treatment they received has cured them from Ebola, USA Today reported.(Photo: AP Photo/Courtesy Jeremy Writebol)

Protests Continue  - CLAYTON, MO - AUGUST 20: Lennil Johnson demonstrates outside of the Buzz Westfall Justice Center where a grand jury began looking at the circumstances surrounding the fatal police shooting of an unarmed teenager Michael Brown on August 20, 2014 in Clayton, Missouri. Brown was shot 6 times and killed by a Ferguson, Missouri police officer on August 9. Despite the Brown family's continued call for peaceful demonstrations, violent protests have erupted nearly every night in Ferguson since his death.(Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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How Gun Violence Kills Our Youth - The Huffington Post breaks down current data that shows that almost half of all young people killed by gun violence are African-American. Specifically, Black male teens ages 15-19 are almost eight times more likely to be killed by gun fire than white male teens and almost 40 times more likely than white female teens. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Drug Possibly Saves Ebola Patients - Two American missionary workers were given an experimental drug that might have saved their lives. After being administered the medication, Dr. Kent Brantley and Nancy Writebol reportedly began to do better. Biotech firm Mapp Biopharmaceutical created the drug by first testing it in monkeys. Two out of four monkeys given the drug survived. Prior to its use on the American patients, the drug had not been tested on humans before. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Pregnant? You Need a Flu Shot - The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists are urging pregnant women to get vaccinated for influenza this fall. The group says that the flu can have serious complications in expectant mothers such as pneumonia and premature labor. The best vaccine to get isn’t the mist vaccine; it’s not safe for pregnant women. Instead, ask for a inactivated flu vaccine, Health Day suggests.(Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Rich People Exercise, Poor People Take Diet Pills - While a study suggests that Americans regardless of income bracket want to lose weight, richer Americans are more successful at it. Researchers found that low-income folks are more likely to rely on diet pills, were 50 percent less likely to exercise and 42 percent less likely to drink water, The Atlantic points out. (Photo: Jose Luis Pelaez Inc/Blend Images/Corbis)

Does Smoking Weed Harm Teens? Brains? - Smoking weed can consistently negatively affect teens? brain development. It can cause poor attention skills, lower cognitive skills and decrease IQ, says a new study. Researchers found that the more one smoked, the more they saw abnormalities in the gray matter of a teen?s brain, the section that controls intelligence. (Photo: Ed Andrieski/AP Photo)

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Does Smoking Weed Harm Teens’ Brains? - Smoking weed can consistently negatively affect teens’ brain development. It can cause poor attention skills, lower cognitive skills and decrease IQ, says a new study. Researchers found that the more one smoked, the more they saw abnormalities in the gray matter of a teen’s brain, the section that controls intelligence. (Photo: Ed Andrieski/AP Photo)