Daufuskie Island: A Community Founded by Freed Slaves

Take a look at the rich photos donated to the Smithsonian.

Blossom, 1979 - Bank of America has donated 61 vibrant black-and-white photographs of a community founded by freed slaves to the Smithsonian?s National Museum of African-American History and Culture. The culture of Daufuskie Island in South Carolina remains closely tied to its African heritage. Take a look at the rich images captured by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe. ? Natelege Whaley (@natelege)   (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

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Blossom, 1979 - Bank of America has donated 61 vibrant black-and-white photographs of a community founded by freed slaves to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African-American History and Culture. The culture of Daufuskie Island in South Carolina remains closely tied to its African heritage. Take a look at the rich images captured by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe. — Natelege Whaley (@natelege) (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

Miss Bertha, 1977 - Daufuskie Island is located off the South Carolina coast, where inhabitants of the Gullah/Geechee tradition lived in isolation.   (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

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Miss Bertha, 1977 - Daufuskie Island is located off the South Carolina coast, where inhabitants of the Gullah/Geechee tradition lived in isolation.  (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

Girl in Screen Door, 1977 - Photographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe captured the images between 1977 and 1981. "To give this just incredible, warm, giving, nurturing community of people recognition that they were able to thrive as long as they did, that to me is a testament to them and to our culture," Moutoussamy-Ashe said, according to the Associated Press.   (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

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Girl in Screen Door, 1977 - Photographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe captured the images between 1977 and 1981. "To give this just incredible, warm, giving, nurturing community of people recognition that they were able to thrive as long as they did, that to me is a testament to them and to our culture," Moutoussamy-Ashe said, according to the Associated Press. (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

Susie Standing Next to Holy Picture, c. 1978 - (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

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Susie Standing Next to Holy Picture, c. 1978 - (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

Jake and His Boat Arriving on Daufuskie's Shore, c. 1978 - The residents supported themselves by catching oysters and growing cotton.   (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

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Jake and His Boat Arriving on Daufuskie's Shore, c. 1978 - The residents supported themselves by catching oysters and growing cotton. (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

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The Old Prayer House Before Hurricane David, April 1979, 1979 - Besides what is left of this prayer house, the island had a co-op store and a two-room schoolhouse.  (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

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The Old Prayer House Before Hurricane David, April 1979, 1979 - Besides what is left of this prayer house, the island had a co-op store and a two-room schoolhouse. (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

Shrimper and Son, c. 1978 - The documentation of the remaining 84 people on the island at the time will be installed in the Smithsonian's National Museum of African-American History and Culture. The building is scheduled to open in 2015.   (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)

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Shrimper and Son, c. 1978 - The documentation of the remaining 84 people on the island at the time will be installed in the Smithsonian's National Museum of African-American History and Culture. The building is scheduled to open in 2015. (Photo: Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe (American, b. 1952)/Courtesy of the National Museum of African American History and Culture)