BET Wire: Is the Ebola Crisis This Year's October Surprise?

The Ebola crisis could impact outcome of midterm elections.

In Case You Missed It - Republicans leave President Obama scratching his head; Ben Carson kind of blames the spread of measles on immigrants; one lawmaker thinks it's OK if your food service worker doesn't wash his hands after a bathroom break ? and more. ? Joyce Jones (@BETpolitichick)

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In Case You Missed It - The Ebola crisis sidelines President Obama from the campaign trail and could impact the midterm elections; First Lady Michelle Obama says she's losing it; an African-American newspaper endorses a Republican governor; the Confederate flag above South Carolina's state capitol is no biggie, Gov. Nikki Haley says – and more. –  Joyce Jones (@BETpolitichick) (Photo: BET)

The October Surprise - In the political lexicon, an October surprise is an unexpected event that has the potential to strongly influence the outcome of a November election. Hurricane Sandy and a sex scandal involving a House lawmaker and congressional pages are a couple of examples. This year it seems to be the growing Ebola crisis, which has the president and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle battling to be the strongest on the issue.  (Photo: Corbis)

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The October Surprise - In the political lexicon, an October surprise is an unexpected event that has the potential to strongly influence the outcome of a November election. Hurricane Sandy and a sex scandal involving a House lawmaker and congressional pages are a couple of examples. This year it seems to be the growing Ebola crisis, which has the president and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle battling to be the strongest on the issue. (Photo: Corbis)

A More Aggressive Approach - Obama canceled out-of-town campaign jaunts to address the growing Ebola crisis in the U.S. and ease Americans' fears. After meeting with cabinet members, he vowed to respond to new cases "in a much more aggressive way." The president also issued an executive order allowing the Pentagon to call up reserve troops to combat the crisis in Africa.(Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo)

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A More Aggressive Approach - Obama canceled out-of-town campaign jaunts to address the growing Ebola crisis in the U.S. and ease Americans' fears. After meeting with cabinet members, he vowed to respond to new cases "in a much more aggressive way." The president also issued an executive order allowing the Pentagon to call up reserve troops to combat the crisis in Africa.(Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo)

Time for a Travel Ban? - Capitol Hill lawmakers sharply grilled officials from the Centers for Disease Control on the two Dallas nurses who treated the only Ebola patient in the U.S. who has died and questioned the agency's policies and procedures. "The trust and credibility of the administration and government are waning," said Rep. Tim Murphy, who chaired the hearing. The Pennsylvania Republican and others also suggested it might be time to ban travelers from West Africa. So far, 60 House members and 11 senators have said they favor a travel ban. (Photo: AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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Time for a Travel Ban? - Capitol Hill lawmakers sharply grilled officials from the Centers for Disease Control on the two Dallas nurses who treated the only Ebola patient in the U.S. who has died and questioned the agency's policies and procedures. "The trust and credibility of the administration and government are waning," said Rep. Tim Murphy, who chaired the hearing. The Pennsylvania Republican and others also suggested it might be time to ban travelers from West Africa. So far, 60 House members and 11 senators have said they favor a travel ban. (Photo: AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Voter ID on Trial - On Sept. 2, lawyers for the Justice Department began oral arguments against Texas's voter-ID requirement, which the law's opponents say discriminates against Blacks and Hispanics. If the state loses, it could be required to get federal approval before making future changes to its voting procedures.   (Photo: Eric Gay, File/AP Photo)

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The Texas Voter ID Two-Step - A federal appeals court in Texas reinstated the state's controversial voter ID law, less than a week before the start of early voting, overturning a ruling by the U.S. District Court that blocked the law because it was discriminatory and a violation of the Voting Rights Act. (Photo: Eric Gay, File/AP Photo)

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What a Difference Four Years Can Make - Who says African-Americans support only Democrats? Call & Post, a Black-owned newspaper in Cleveland, has endorsed the state's incumbent Republican Gov. John Kasic for re-election. "Over the last four years, we have watched as this governor time and again stand [sic] up for Black people. We have seen with our own eyes how he has championed the poor and underserved," the editors wrote. Four years ago, they said a Kasic endorsement was unthinkable.(Photo: Steve Marcus/Reuters /Landov )

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What a Difference Four Years Can Make - Who says African-Americans support only Democrats? Call & Post, a Black-owned newspaper in Cleveland, has endorsed the state's incumbent Republican Gov. John Kasic for re-election. "Over the last four years, we have watched as this governor time and again stand [sic] up for Black people. We have seen with our own eyes how he has championed the poor and underserved," the editors wrote. Four years ago, they said a Kasic endorsement was unthinkable.(Photo: Steve Marcus/Reuters /Landov )

Filling a Void - The president has announced plans to nominate ACLU attorney Vanita Gupta to be the new assistant attorney general for civil rights at the Justice Department. The position has been vacant for more than a year. Wade Henderson, who heads the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, applauded the choice. Gupta "is extremely well-prepared for, and, given the pressing civil rights issues facing our nation, well-matched to the considerable challenges ahead of her," he said.   (Photo: AP Photo/Justice Department)

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Filling a Void - The president has announced plans to nominate ACLU attorney Vanita Gupta to be the new assistant attorney general for civil rights at the Justice Department. The position has been vacant for more than a year. Wade Henderson, who heads the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, applauded the choice. Gupta "is extremely well-prepared for, and, given the pressing civil rights issues facing our nation, well-matched to the considerable challenges ahead of her," he said. (Photo: AP Photo/Justice Department)

How Are You Doing? - Only 22 percent of Americans feel financially better off since Obama took office six years ago, according to a new Washington Post/ABC News poll. Thirty-three percent of African-Americans said they?re better off, while 8 percent said they?re worse off.  (Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times/Getty Images)

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How Are You Doing? - Only 22 percent of Americans feel financially better off since Obama took office six years ago, according to a new Washington Post/ABC News poll. Thirty-three percent of African-Americans said they’re better off, while 8 percent said they’re worse off. (Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times/Getty Images)

What's in a Name? - During a campaign rally for Iowa's U.S. Senate Democratic nominee, Bruce Braley, First Lady Michelle Obama repeatedly mispronounced his name, calling him Bruce Bailey. ?Braley? What did I say? I?m losing it. I?m getting old. I?ve been traveling too much,? Obama joked after someone in the audience corrected her. She's not alone. Former President Bill Clinton made the same gaffe at another event for Braley. (Photo: ABC)

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What's in a Name? - During a campaign rally for Iowa's U.S. Senate Democratic nominee, Bruce Braley, First Lady Michelle Obama repeatedly mispronounced his name, calling him Bruce Bailey. “Braley? What did I say? I’m losing it. I’m getting old. I’ve been traveling too much,” Obama joked after someone in the audience corrected her. She's not alone. Former President Bill Clinton made the same gaffe at another event for Braley. (Photo: ABC)

Letting Her Racist Flag Fly - If the Confederate flag is okay to corporations seeking to do business in South Carolina, it's way okay for Gov. Nikki Haley. During a debate in which her Democratic opponent questioned the wisdom of having the racist symbol flying above the state's capitol, she said, "What I can tell you is over the last three and a half years, I spent a lot of my days on the phones with CEOs and recruiting jobs to this state. I can honestly say I have not had one conversation with a single CEO about the Confederate flag," she said. Haley also pointed to herself and U.S. Sen. Tim Scott as evidence that the state's racist image has been "fixed." (Photo: Wade Spees, The Post And Courier/AP Photo)

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Letting Her Racist Flag Fly - If the Confederate flag is okay to corporations seeking to do business in South Carolina, it's way okay for Gov. Nikki Haley. During a debate in which her Democratic opponent questioned the wisdom of having the racist symbol flying above the state's capitol, she said, "What I can tell you is over the last three and a half years, I spent a lot of my days on the phones with CEOs and recruiting jobs to this state. I can honestly say I have not had one conversation with a single CEO about the Confederate flag," she said. Haley also pointed to herself and U.S. Sen. Tim Scott as evidence that the state's racist image has been "fixed." (Photo: Wade Spees, The Post And Courier/AP Photo)

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It's Unanimous - Arkansas's highest court on Oct. 15 struck down a law requiring voters to present photo identification at the polls. It said it violates the state's constitution, which requires only that the person be a citizen of the state and the nation and be at least 18 years old and lawfully registered. Adding a new requirement is unconstitutional, the Supreme Court justices unanimously ruled.    (Photo: Rick Gershon/Getty Images)

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It's Unanimous - Arkansas's highest court on Oct. 15 struck down a law requiring voters to present photo identification at the polls. It said it violates the state's constitution, which requires only that the person be a citizen of the state and the nation and be at least 18 years old and lawfully registered. Adding a new requirement is unconstitutional, the Supreme Court justices unanimously ruled. (Photo: Rick Gershon/Getty Images)

Verification Procedure - The election judge is required to compare the name on the ID card to the voter registration card or the computerized voter roll maintained at the precinct. If the names are not a match, the election judge can declare them "substantially similar" if the difference is slight (Wendy Davis vs. Wendy Russell Davis), a customary variation (Gregory Abbott vs. Greg Abbott) or if the name is the same but filled out in a different order (Mary Jones vs. Mary Jones Smith).The election judge also will verify the voter's address before providing a ballot.  (Photo: Steve Debenport/Getty Images)

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Lying Eyes - A recent University of Delaware study found that "67 percent of white voters support voter ID laws when there is no photo provided or when they are shown a photo of white voters," Think Progress reports, "but their support jumps by six percent when they see a photo of African-Americans using a voting machine." (Photo: Steve Debenport/Getty Images)

Down for the GOP? - According to an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released Wednesday, 46 percent of Americans prefer a GOP-led Congress, compared to 44 percent who want Democrats in control of both chambers. Opinions differ about whether that will happen when they head to the polls in November, but to win control of the Senate, the GOP needs to net six seats. The party is likely to maintain control of the House.   (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

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Down for the GOP? - According to an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll released Wednesday, 46 percent of Americans prefer a GOP-led Congress, compared to 44 percent who want Democrats in control of both chambers. Opinions differ about whether that will happen when they head to the polls in November, but to win control of the Senate, the GOP needs to net six seats. The party is likely to maintain control of the House. (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)