The Week in Polls: Obama Pulls Ahead; Romney Wins the Middle

A look at a few political and national polls from the week.

Dead Heat - President Obama and Mitt Romney have spent a lot of time and money in Florida in an effort to win its 29 electoral votes, but the state is clearly divided. In a Tampa Bay Times Miami Herald/Bay News 9 poll, 48 percent of likely voters support Obama, while 47 percent back Romney. The president also has an 11-point lead among Latino voters, a key voting bloc.  (Photos from left: AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, Allan Tannenbaum-Pool/Getty Images)

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Dead Heat - President Obama and Mitt Romney have spent a lot of time and money in Florida in an effort to win its 29 electoral votes, but the state is clearly divided. In a Tampa Bay Times Miami Herald/Bay News 9 poll, 48 percent of likely voters support Obama, while 47 percent back Romney. The president also has an 11-point lead among Latino voters, a key voting bloc. (Photos from left: AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, Allan Tannenbaum-Pool/Getty Images)

Going to the Extremes to Get in Shape - While some health experts believe popular home fitness routines such as P90X and Insanity are safe, they warn sedentary folks that doing too much too soon may cause injuries, writes the Grio. Not to mention you might lose interest because the workouts are just too hard. Their advice: Start slow.  (Photo: Anderson Ross/Getty Images)

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The New Workout Plan - Summer may be over, but plenty of Americans are still feeling the burn — in the gym, at least. In a Gallup poll published Sept. 20, 54.7 percent of people reported working out three or more days a week in August, up from 53.3 percent in 2011 and 52.3 percent in 2010. (Photo: Andersen Ross/Getty Images)

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Academic Payoff - Adults aged 25 to 54 (62 percent), college graduates (58 percent) and post-grads (60 percent) are the most likely to hold full-time jobs with an employer, according to a Gallup poll published Sept. 18. Comparatively, 34 percent of people with a high school diploma or less reported the same. (Photo: Chris Hondros/Getty Images)

Free Syria Army Finds Victories - In late July 2012, Syria’s rebel faction, Free Syria Army, posted several victories including the seizure of Aleppo, the main city of the North and the capture of 150 government troops.  (Photo: AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

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Crisis in the Middle East - A large share of Americans (43 percent) have been following the news about recent attacks on embassies in Libya and Egypt and the killing of an American ambassador, making it the most closely followed foreign news story this year, according to a Pew poll released Sept. 17. Forty-five percent of people approve of President Obama's response, compared to 26 percent who approved of Mitt Romney's comments. (Photo: AP Photo/ Khalil Hamra)

Are You Better Off? - It's a question GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney has asked of voters time and time again: Are their lives better now than four years ago? In a New York Times/CBS News poll published Sept. 14, about 25 percent said their lives were better, nearly the same said their lives were worse and about half of all respondents reported their lives hadn't changed.   (Photo: AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

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Are You Better Off? - It's a question GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney has asked of voters time and time again: Are their lives better now than four years ago? In a New York Times/CBS News poll published Sept. 14, about 25 percent said their lives were better, nearly the same said their lives were worse and about half of all respondents reported their lives hadn't changed.  (Photo: AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

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Medi-scared? - Once upon a time, voters who were 60 and older preferred Romney by 20 percentage points. Now he has a margin of less than 4 points, according to a new Reuters/Ipsos poll. The change may in part be attributed to fears over how the Republican would handle Medicare, which most seniors depend on.  (Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

A Glass Half Full - Though the race is still tight, Obama is pulling ahead of Romney nationwide. In a Politico/George Washington University Battleground Poll, the president leads Romney by 50 to 47 percent and has a job approval rating of 50 percent. Still, 48 percent disapprove of how he's handling his job.  (Photo by Pete Souza/The White House via Getty Images)

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A Glass Half Full - Though the race is still tight, Obama is pulling ahead of Romney nationwide. In a Politico/George Washington University Battleground Poll, the president leads Romney by 50 to 47 percent and has a job approval rating of 50 percent. Still, 48 percent disapprove of how he's handling his job. (Photo by Pete Souza/The White House via Getty Images)

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Winning the Middle - Obama's mantra has been that the nation cannot have a strong economy without a strong middle class, but it's Romney who leads among this group, according to a Politico/George Washington University Battleground Poll. The middle class, which accounts for 54 percent of the American electorate, prefers the Republican by 55 to 44 percent. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)