March on Washington: Memorable Quotes From 2013

Al Sharpton, John Lewis, Eric Holder and more speak out.

Al Sharpton - Thousands of participants crowded the National Mall on Aug. 24 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Civil rights leaders and politicians took to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to talk about dreams realized and the fight we still face. Take a look at some notable quotes from the day?s speakers.    ?But let us remember 50 years ago ? some came to Washington, having rode the back of buses. Some came to Washington ? they couldn?t stop and buy a cup of coffee till they got across the Mason-Dixon line,? Rev. Al Sharpton said. ?Some came having seen their friends shed blood. But they came to Washington, so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today.? (Photo: REUTERS/Larry Downing)

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Al Sharpton - Thousands of participants crowded the National Mall on Aug. 24 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Civil rights leaders and politicians took to the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to talk about dreams realized and the fight we still face. Take a look at some notable quotes from the day’s speakers.   “But let us remember 50 years ago — some came to Washington, having rode the back of buses. Some came to Washington — they couldn’t stop and buy a cup of coffee till they got across the Mason-Dixon line,” Rev. Al Sharpton said. “Some came having seen their friends shed blood. But they came to Washington, so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today.” (Photo: REUTERS/Larry Downing)

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Martin Luther King III - "This is not the time for nostalgic commemoration," said Martin Luther King III, the oldest son of the slain civil rights leader. "Nor is this the time for self-congratulatory celebration. The task is not done. The journey is not complete. We can and we must do more."  (Photo: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

C.T. Vivian - ?The greatest spiritual leadership in America has come from African-Americans," said C.T. Vivian, a civil rights activist and close friend to Martin Luther King Jr. (Photo: Monica Morgan/WireImage)

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C.T. Vivian - “The greatest spiritual leadership in America has come from African-Americans," said C.T. Vivian, a civil rights activist and close friend to Martin Luther King Jr. (Photo: Monica Morgan/WireImage)

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Attorney General Eric Holder - "They marched in spite of animosity, oppression and brutality because they believed in the greatness of what this nation could become and despaired of the founding promises not kept."  (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

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Rep. John Lewis - “If someone had told me 50 years ago that an African-American would be in the White House as the president, I probably would have said, 'You’re crazy. You are out of your mind. You don’t know what you’re talking about,'” Rep. John Lewis said. “The country is a different country, and we’re better people.” (Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

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Trayvon's Mother, Sybrina Fulton - "Trayvon Martin was my son. But he's not just my son, he's all of our sons. We have to protect our children," said Sybrina Fulton, the mother of Trayvon Martin, who was killed by George Zimmerman in February 2012. (Photo: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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Trayvon's Mother, Sybrina Fulton - "Trayvon Martin was my son. But he's not just my son, he's all of our sons. We have to protect our children," said Sybrina Fulton, the mother of Trayvon Martin, who was killed by George Zimmerman in February 2012. (Photo: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Cory Booker - "The truth of the matter is, that the dream still demands that the moral conscience of our country still calls us, that hope still needs heroes. We need to understand that there is still work to do," said Newark, New Jersey, Mayor Cory Booker. (Photo: Monica Morgan/WireImage)

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Cory Booker - "The truth of the matter is, that the dream still demands that the moral conscience of our country still calls us, that hope still needs heroes. We need to understand that there is still work to do," said Newark, New Jersey, Mayor Cory Booker. (Photo: Monica Morgan/WireImage)

Rep. Nancy Pelosi - "Dr. King's words must continue to inspire us to compose, as Dr. King said on that August afternoon, a beautiful symphony of brotherhood," said Nancy Pelosi, minority leader of the House of Representatives. "Are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? Are you ready to realize the dream?" (Photo by Monica Morgan/WireImage)

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Rep. Nancy Pelosi - "Dr. King's words must continue to inspire us to compose, as Dr. King said on that August afternoon, a beautiful symphony of brotherhood," said Nancy Pelosi, minority leader of the House of Representatives. "Are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? Are you ready to realize the dream?" (Photo by Monica Morgan/WireImage)

Myrlie Evers-Williams - ?There are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom and I ask you today, will you allow that to happen?? said Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain civil rights activist Medgar Evers. ?Take the words stand your ground in a positive sense. Stand your ground in terms of fighting for justice and equality.? (Photo: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

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Myrlie Evers-Williams - “There are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom and I ask you today, will you allow that to happen?” said Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain civil rights activist Medgar Evers. “Take the words stand your ground in a positive sense. Stand your ground in terms of fighting for justice and equality.” (Photo: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Joseph Lowery - ?Everything has changed and nothing has changed and we?ve come up here for two reasons: not just to come to Washington, we come to Washington to commemorate, we go back home to agitate,? said former president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Joseph Lowery. ?Because while many things have changed, some things have not changed and we want to go back home to complete the unfinished task.? (Photo by Monica Morgan/WireImage)

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Joseph Lowery - “Everything has changed and nothing has changed and we’ve come up here for two reasons: not just to come to Washington, we come to Washington to commemorate, we go back home to agitate,” said former president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Joseph Lowery. “Because while many things have changed, some things have not changed and we want to go back home to complete the unfinished task.” (Photo by Monica Morgan/WireImage)

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Bernice King - “Struggle is a never-ending process and freedom must be won by every generation,” said Bernice King, one of Martin Luther King Jr.’s daughters. She also led the crowd in a powerful prayer just before the march began. (Photo by Monica Morgan/WireImage)