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Samuel L. Jackson Goes Off On People Who Say Quentin Tarantino Can’t Use The N-Word

The two worked together on the controversial film "Django Unchained."

Quentin Tarantino has been criticized for years over his constant use of the N-word in his films. With a new documentary titled QT8: The First Eight putting a spotlight on this particular controversy, Samuel L. Jackson, one of the director's most frequent collaborators, is coming to his defense.

According to IndieWire, Jackson, who worked with Tarantino in the 2012 slavery drama Django Unchained, is outwardly criticizing those who point the finger at the famed director, claiming there is a clear double standard being practiced.

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"You take 12 Years a Slave, which is supposedly made by an auteur. Steve McQueen is very different than Quentin," Jackson said in the clip. "When you have a song that says n****r in it 300 times, nobody says s**t. So, it's OK for Steve McQueen to use [the N-Word] because he's artistically attacking the system and the way people think and feel, but Quentin is just doing it to just strike the blackboard with his nails. That's not true. There's no dishonesty in anything that [Quentin] writes or how people talk, feel, or speak [in his films]."

Take a look, below:

In the clip, Jackson is referring to a scene in the Oscar-winning 12 Years a Slave where Paul Dano's character, Tibeats, repeatedly hurls the N-word while singing a song to a group of slaves.

The site further states that Django Unchained, specifically, features nearly 110 uses of the N-word in total.

QT8: The First Eight will be available to stream on VOD platforms beginning on December 4.

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