Howard University And Other HBCUs Offer Free COVID-19 Testing

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 15:  The Howard University Interdisciplinary Research Building is an 81,670 gross square foot, state of the art research facility on Georgia Avenue and W Street in Northwest Washington DC on April 15, 2016.  The research space creates synergies that lead to research opportunities among investigators across disciplines and provide core and user space to researchers on 

(Photo by Kate Patterson for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Howard University And Other HBCUs Offer Free COVID-19 Testing

Our legacy institutions are stepping up to fight the spread of the coronavirus.

Published 1 week ago

Written by BET Staff

The coronavirus has had a devastating impact on Black communities across the country. While the Trump administration seemingly remains confused as to why this is happening and millions of Americans no longer have access to affordable healthcare due to cuts made to the Affordable Care Act, HBCUs are stepping up. 

According to ABC News, HBCUs like Alabama State University and Florida A&M University are offering free testing. Howard University in Washington, D.C, is offering free testing to any local resident, regardless if they have symptoms.

A woman who participated in the services at Howard said to ABC, “I got tested because it was free and I thought, why not? It may also save a whole lot of lives. You can't treat what you don't know you have.”

RELATED: Louisiana Governor Forming Task Force Targeted At COVID-19’s Effect on African Americans

A spokesperson for Howard told ABC News the majority of patients who tested positive at their clinic were asymptomatic, which further proves the need for testing to slow the spread. 

According to the New York Times, in the United States, over 93,000 people have died from COVID-19 and there are 1.5 million infections.

Watch the ABC News story below:

For the latest on the coronavirus, check out BET’s blog on the virus, and contact your local health department or visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

(Photo by Kate Patterson for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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