Watch: J. Alexander Kueng, Cop Charged In George Floyd's Death, Get Publicly Shamed While Grocery Shopping

Watch: J. Alexander Kueng, Cop Charged In George Floyd's Death, Get Publicly Shamed While Grocery Shopping

The former officer is out on a $750,000 bond.

Published 1 week ago

Written by Alexis Reese

June 25 will mark the one month anniversary of the horrific killing of George Floyd, who died after a former officer, Derek Chauvin, kneeled in his neck for nearly nine minutes. Chauvin and the three officers who assisted him in the killing were fired from the police department, arrested and charged. One, however, was able to post a $750,000 bond and get out of custody. Now, that former officer is out grocery shopping like nothing happened — and one Minneapolis resident wasn’t having it.

J. Alexander Kueng was spotted at a Cub Foods store in the early hours on Sunday (June 21) with a pack of Oreos and a gallon of milk in his hands, headed to the checkout line. Another shopper, a woman, began recording him, outraged that a man involved in such a horrific death is able to shop in peace.

“What’s your name?” a woman taking the video asks. 

“Oh, yeah that’s me,” Kueng responds.

After confirming his identity, the lady behind the camera questions Kueng for comfortably walking in public after posting $750,00 bond and being released on Friday (June 19). 

“I wouldn’t call it comfortably. I would just say getting necessities,” he says.

RELATED: Officer Who Kneeled On George Floyd’s Neck Blamed For Death By Other Two Officers

The staggering two-minute encounter included the most important question asked to Kueng: “Do you feel any remorse for what you did?” 

But the officer charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter, did not respond.

During the first court appearance on June 4 for the attorney’s representing the three officers involved in Floyd’s death, Thomas Plunkett, who represents Keung attempted to distance his client for Derek Chauvin’s actions. 

According to The Star Tribune, Plunkett tried to humanize him by saying he “is a Black man who grew up in north Minneapolis with a single mom who adopted four at-risk children from the community.”

Plunkett also stated, “At all times Mr. Kueng and Mr. Lane turned their attention to that 19-year veteran. [Kueng] was trying — they were trying to communicate that this situation needs to change direction.”

Kueng joined the Minneapolis Police Department in December 2019 but May 25 was only his third full shift as a police officer.

BET has been covering every angle of the police killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks and other social justice cases and the subsequent aftermath and protests. For our continuing coverage, click here.

(Photo courtesy of Twitter)

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