WATCH ALL YOUR FAVORITE BET SHOWS

Parents Of 13-Year-Old Who Died During A Traffic Stop Will File Wrongful Death Lawsuit

Stanley Davis’ family is represented by Benjamin Crump.

The parents of Stanley Davis III will file a wrongful death lawsuit after the 13-year-old died during an attempted traffic stop in Boynton Beach, Florida.

According to The Palm Beach Post, Benjamin Crump, who represents the family, said the lawsuit has not been filed as of yet because Florida law requires attorneys “give written notice to a municipality and wait six months after the notice before legal action can be taken.”

It’s possible Boynton Beach will settle with Davis’ parents before the lawsuit is filed.

RELATED: Rev. Al Sharpton Talks Police Accountability, Activism, And The Perils Of ‘Latte Liberals’ in New Book

According to ABC News, on December 26, Davis died after his dirt bike crashed while he was being pursued by a Boynton Beach police officer.

The Boynton Beach Police Department said the "preliminary investigation indicates that the dirt bike operator was observed driving recklessly on Boynton Beach Boulevard. Officers attempted a traffic stop, and the dirt bike went down in the 800 block of North Federal Highway."

Crump told ABC News that Davis got the dirt bike as a Christmas gift and his death has been “an absolute nightmare” for the family and the community.

Florida law states that a dirt bike is considered an “off-highway vehicle” and the operator must be at least 16 years old. However, riding a dirt bike on a city street is only a civil violation of the city code.

Boynton Beach Mayor Steven Grant faced criticism after saying the city and law enforcement were “responsible” for Davis’ death. He later responded, saying his comments were taken out of context and the investigation is ongoing, ABC News reports.

When asked if the officer involved in the pursuit violated the law regarding vehicular pursuits, a

BBPD spokesperson told ABC News, "The investigation into this crash is ongoing."

The department said it cannot release the officer’s name due to his right to Marsy’s Law, which states “every victim is entitled to the right to be free from intimidation, harassment and abuse,” a BBPD spokesperson told the news station.

Latest News

Subscribe for BET Updates

Provide your email address to receive our newsletter.

Select the types of notification you would like to receive from us. Please note, you must choose at least one.


By clicking subscribe, I consent to receiving newsletters and other marketing emails. Newsletters are subject to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. Users can unsubscribe at any time.