Eric Benet Believes These Black Rappers Are Faces Of White Supremacy

HOLLYWOOD, CA - JANUARY 20:  Eric Benet attends 'Lisa Edelstein and D.B. Woodside visit Hollywood Today Live' at W Hollywood on January 20, 2017 in Hollywood, California.  (Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

Eric Benet Believes These Black Rappers Are Faces Of White Supremacy

"Inconvenient truth to some of the rich and famous."

Published August 6, 2018

R&B neo-soulster Eric Benét stepped away from his rhythm-and-blues territory to make a stance on hip-hop grounds for Sunday (August 5), and his PSA to a certain rap kind might ruffle a few feathers.

The Hurricane crooner declared on Instagram that Black hip-hop artists are the poisons of their own communities when rapping about a list of vices, such as misogynoir, drug abuse and materialism. He believes that this kind of music is so toxic, in fact, that those very artists behind such messages are tools of white supremacy “being used to help destroy your own people,” Benét’s post reads.

After The Shade Room reposted his clip, the artists showing up to voice their thoughts on his message were slim to none. But Washington, D.C.’s poetic rap star and MMG emcee Wale was one of them.

  1. ‘Inconvenient truth to some of the rich and famous,’ he wrote in the caption…

    The post added the murder of other Blacks and “living a low life” in hip-hop music as other qualifications for rappers to serve as the face of white supremacy. It racked up over 6,000 likes, with commenters slinging arguments back and forth in defense or in offense of the post.

  2. Wale stood on neither side, but did peel back some of hip-hop’s history for enlightenment

    “Hip-hop always had an affinity for material things,” he wrote in TSR’s comments. “It’s a part of the very fabric (no pun) but does not define the players IN said genre.” He went on to explain that while the R&B singer does have one point, it’s not the only one on the controversial subject matter at hand.

    (Photo: Instagram/@theshaderoom)
  3. This wouldn’t be the first time Benét’s opposition has dabbled into the hip-hop space, either

    Upon the release of Jay-Z’s 4:44 album, he name-dropped Benét on his “Kill Jay-Z” track that references the singer’s turbulent former relationship with Hollywood A-lister Halle Berry.

    “Hey yo #JayZ! Just so ya know, I got the baddest girl in the world as my wife…like right now!” he responded to Hov’s “you almost went Eric Benét/ Let the baddest girl in the world get away/ I don't even know what else to say/ N**ga, never go Eric Benét!” line.

    Despite Benet’s past objections, is he speaking facts with his newest commentary on rap society?

Written by Diamond Alexis

(Photo: Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

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